Tests in Starting at Macon

Tests in Starting at Macon

To show the citizens of Macon, Ga., how quickly the fire department can answer calls, Chief L. M. Jones instituted a series of tests at 8 o’clock p. m. By these he proved that nine seconds only are required for the first piece of apparatus (motor) to leave the building, while the last can be out and on its way in 17 seconds. Chief Jones posted members of the staff of a local newspaper with stop-watches alongside of the fire gongs and sent all the firemen except the two members of the floor watch upstairs. The chief pulled the alarm. The first test showed Pump No. 3 to be the quickest in getting out. but this was because of the jamming by the door of the chief’s wagon. In the second test his wagon left the building in nine seconds from the first sound of the gong. The first test showed that the six men of the pump crew could slide down the poles, start the motor, open the doors and be away in 12 seconds. In the second the chemical, which stands behind the chiefs wagon, was gone in 17 seconds. The six-cylinder motor truck was equally expeditious. In each test the conditions were normal. The department had not been out during the day and the motors of the pieces of apparatus had not been warmed up by running. On the first turn of the crank the machinery was in motion and the machines were on the move. Telephone calls, when they are not confusing (as often happens when the’caller is excited), get the apparatus more quickly to the scene of a Macon fire.

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