Tests of Aircraft Cabin Materials

Tests of Aircraft Cabin Materials

The effect of fire on materials used in aircraft cabins is discussed in terms of the smoke and gases produced in a rematerials, mostly plastics, were tested under both flaming and smoldering conditions for the density and production rate of smoke and the generation of carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide and other gases.

The results of the tests are tabulated in “Smoke and Gases Produced by Burning Aircraft Interior Materials,” available from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402, for 35 cents.

A wide range of smoke levels was experienced during the testing of many materials. The highest optical smoke density’ indices were noted with ABS (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) plastics, and the largest HC1 concentrations were produced by some of the chlorinated vinyLs. Although chemical additives can increase the flame resistance of conventional thermoplastics, the problem of excessive smoke for these materials remains. The tests showed a need to develop plastics that will develop less smoke. Some of the newer plastics tested showed good heat stability and low heat release.

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