That Electric Stone.

That Electric Stone.

A reporter of The Omaha Herald the other day gave rein to his fiery, untamed imagination and thus described a truly wonderful discovery calculated to revolutionize the electrical industries of the country :

There is a wizard’s den on Thirteenth street, opposite the Omaha National Rank. There are more wonderful things to he seen there than Aladdin ever discovered with his wonderful lamp. If perpetual motion is not to he seen it is something so near to it that it is hard to distinguish the difference. There is power and light hidden in a brown mineral, and it is set loose to do its work for the benefit of mankind by bringing it in contact with a little salt water contained in an earthen jar. No one knows the source or cause of this electric power. A chemical analysis shows that the mineral is composed of graphite carbon, soluble and insoluble iron, aluminum, calcium, magnesium, and silica. This mineral is found in inexhaustible quantities in New York. Michigan and elsewhere. It can he delivered in Omaha for $6 or $7 per ton. It generates electricity, but a new kind of electricity. It is perfectly harmless. One may take hold, with bare, moist hands, of a wire which carries a current sufficient for an arc light and he will feel nothing at all. Anyone can manage it. It does not require a skillful electrician. All one has to do is to get a piece of the mineral, immerse it in salt water, attach a wire at the other end a piece of zinc, and presto ! He can run a motor, an arc light, an incandescent light, or any machine, ring any bell, or do anything that can be done by electricity. And the cost? There isn’t any cost, except for electrical appliances. After the mineral ceases to give forth electricity, which is a very long time, the mineral is, by its own action, turned into pure carbon and is worth twice or three times as much per ton as when first purchased. Is that perpetual motion? If not, how far from it is it? What is this world coming to, anyhow?

No posts to display