The A. W. W. A. Convention

The A. W. W. A. Convention

The forty-third annual convention of the American Water Works Association which takes place next week at the Statler Hotel, Detroit, Mich., gives promise to be one of the largest and most successful of the yearly gathering of this body. Everything points to this fact. The association is larger numerically than ever in its history, there is a healthy interest and enthusiasm manifest among its membership, and the number of its sections are constantly on the increase. The convention city, too, is particularly well suited for a large attendance, being centrally located and easily accessible by rail from all parts of the country and from the Dominion of Canada.

The fact of the increase in the number of sections of the association and the spreading out, in at least one instance, of those now in existence is a particularly significant feature of the parent body’s growth. These sub-divisions of the association besides being splendid feeders to it, greatly tend to increase the esprit de corps of its members, and also serve to arouse interest in its national conventions, by stimulating discussion on important water works topics and implanting a desire among the members to further discuss such questions among a wider circle of water works men than the local nature of the section meeting affords.

A move that has done much to increase the prestige of the association among not only water works men but also the general engineering field was the formation and development of the Standardization Council two years ago. This subdivision, with the untiring work of its members, lead by its efficient chairman, George W. Fuller, has earned the thanks of the entire water works fraternity in its accomplishments in matters of standardization. That this work is only in its infancy is evidenced by the message which Mr. Fuller has “broadcasted” through the columns of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING on page 906, as the incoming president of the association. Mr. Fuller has had the courage of his convictions in the formation of this useful branch of the association of which he is to be the head in the coming vear, and evidently believe, in common with the majority of the members, that the council’s accomplishments in the future will far eclipse what it has done in the past.

The same thing, for the matter of that, applies to the association itself. The next decade in its history should show a vast advance in both its usefulness to the water works fraternity and in the number of its members. There is no reason on this earth why every water works superintendent in this broad land of ours should not he a member of the American Water Works Association. That is the purpose of its formation and the reason for its existence. And, furthermore, it will never attain its full usefulness until this goal is reached. The smaller as well as the larger cities should be represented in its ranks. The superintendent of each has his place in the association’s work and can also reap equal benefits from his membership in it.

This, then, should be—and no doubt will be—the aim of the incoming administration: the making of the association more and more of a power in its field and a representative body in which the membership includes practically all of the water works men of the country. Such an object should stimulate the highest efforts not only of the officers, but of every member who has the welfare of the association at heart. LET’S GO!!

The A. W. W. A. Convention

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The A. W. W. A. Convention

The tentative program of the 43d annual convention of the American Water Works Association published in full in last week’s issue of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING shows that the gathering at Detroit is going to be one primarily for business. The sessions as outlined are full of practical papers and discussions and no doubt these will be added to when the final program is arranged.

One particularly commendable feature is the provision for group meetings at which superintendents can choose the topic that interests them most and meet in a more intimate way those who wish to talk over the same subject. In small gatherings of this kind, where there is a common object among those present, there is less constraint than in the larger meetings of the whole convention and the men will be more likely to get upon their feet. This will conduce to more discussion, and the consequent benefit of the convention to all will be greater than ever.

Those of the superintendents of the smaller cities and towns throughout the country who have not decided to go to Detroit should at once take the matter up with their authorities. The money spent in sending the water works superintendents to this convention by the city should be looked upon as an investment—which it really is—and there should be not a moment’s hesitation in providing an appropriation for this purpose. The time is short and the best accommodations will be snatched up by next week. Secure your hotel rooms now, before it is too late, but by all means attend and reap the benefits of contact with other water works men. Send the Superintendent!