THE AHRENS ENGINE AT DALLAS.

THE AHRENS ENGINE AT DALLAS.

The second-size Continental engine recently delivered by the Ahrens Fire Engine company, of Cincinnati, to Dallas, Tex., was tested and subsequently used in furnishing pressure for the fire appliances exhibited at the convention of the International Association of Fire Engineers. Its guarantee was 750 gals, per minute; but, according to the report of Captain (Greely S. Curtis, who took records of the operation of the engine, it exceeded that amount by twenty per cent. I’he following are the official results of the tests:

hirst.—Two lines J’/j-in. hose—100 ft. each, two 1 – in. dia.. regulation smooth-bore nozzles; 140 lbs. steam pressure; 200 lbs. water pressure.

Second.—Two lines 2j4-in. hose, 100 ft. each, siamesed to play through iff$-in. dia., regulation smooth-bore nozzles; 140 lbs. steam pressure; 205 lbs. water pressure.

Third.—Two lines 2/2-in. hose, 100 ft. each, siamesed to play through 1/2-in. dia., regulation smooth-bore nozzles; 140 lbs. steam pressure; 190 lbs. water pressure.

Fifth.—Same as test No. 3, sustaining 96 lbs. pressure at the nozzle, using an Eastman outfit, with 1⅝-⅛. dia. tip.

Fourth.—This test is taken out of its regular order, as it is the most important of the series. The conditions were: Two lines 2½-⅛. hose, 100 ft. each, siamesed to Glazier nozzle, 2 in. dia. tip; 140 lbs. steam pressure; 140 lbs. water pressure at pumps; (x> lbs. water pressure at nozzle; speed of engine—405 turns per minute. Hence, at a piston speed, one-third greater than the normal rating of the steamer, the loss by slip was only three and two-tenths per cent. T he discharge pressure—i. e., 140 lbs., together with the steaming power and steadiness of action; the absence of distress and ease with which the engine acted were appearent and demonstrated the reserve power which the Continental has stored within itself.

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