The American Water Works Association Convention

The American Water Works Association Convention

(Special Dispatch to FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING.)

With satisfactory weather, keen interest displayed, admirable arrangements by the local committees to render the visit of the delegates an enjoyable one and preliminary work thoroughly performed by the officers of the association, the outlook for a decidedly successful convention of the American Water Works Association is of the best. That the attendance would be a large one was indicated by the numbers of delegates who arrived early. The New York delegation was a large one and the members had a pleasant trip. On Monday many familiar faces were to be seen around the corridors of the Planters Hotel and in the Exhibit Hall, which is the official visiting and lounging place. Water Commissioner Edward E. Wall, chairman of the local committee of arrangements was early in evidence, greeting the members of the association as they arrived. President Leisen, however, up to the time of sending this dispatch, had not arrived. There are such a number as well as variety of papers and special committee reports to be presented that this fact together with the business sessions may well require, especially if the discussions are long, that some of the papers may have to be read by the title and ordered printed in the proceedings. The popular secretary, John M. Diven, is as alert as ever and is still attending to his many and onerous duties, assisted by his able and experienced assistant, Miss Edgley. Secretary Diven was early at his post, his office being opened for registration at 8 a. m. and the line of those registering was a steady and long one. Treasurer James M. Caird was likewise busy, looking steadfastly after the flow of currency coming his way. Two others who are notably busy are F. B. Leopold, chairman of the entertainment committee of the Manufacturers’ Association, and Chairman B. B. Hodgman of that association’s exhibit committee. It was not to be expected, because of the difficulties in the way of transportation of goods, that the exhibits of water works supplies and appliances would be as extensive as in other years, but such as are displayed are of substantial interest and receive close attention. The exhibits are of great interest in themselves and are displayed to the best advantage possible in the hall. A large number of manufacturers and representatives are present, insuring the best and most intelligent service to those interested in their goods. The entertainment end of the convention contains much that is bound to afford great pleasure to the members and to the ladies. Mrs. Edward E. Wall is chairman of the ladies’ reception committee and Mrs. T. C. Clifford is chairman of the ladies’ entertainment committee of the Manufacturers’ Association, while Charles R. Wood is as usual the efficient chairman of the golf committee. The golf tournament this afternoon is bound to be one of the notably successful features of the entertainment program. The principal event of last evening was the cordial address of welcome made to the delegates by the Hon. H. W. Keil. the mayor of St. Louis, and another event that was gratefully appreciated was the informal reception and dance at the Planters Hotel, given by courtesy of the local entertainment committee. This was attended by large numbers and proved a thoroughly successful affair, affording an opportunity for old friends to renew acquaintance. The superintendents’ day is being looked forward to as one of the substantial events of interest of the convention, giving, as it will, opportunity for discussion of methods employed in the operation of plants by practical water works men. Just a word about FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING. The special souvenir edition has been pronounced a great success and the copies on display in the exhibit room were eagerly looked for when the hall opened. It is a genuine souvenir edition and its popular features have not failed to prove a great attraction, and the favorable comments give assurance the journal continues to be acknowledged as holding its leading position in the water works field. One of the subjects under discussion is naturally the place for holding next year’s convention, and while a number of cities are all coming in for good words, there seems to be a very strong sentiment in favor of Buffalo, N. Y. The selection is slated to be made at the morning session tomorrow.

The delegation starting from New York City, on Saturday afternoon included Irving A. Rowe and J. S. Warde, Jr., of the Rensselaer Valve Company; S. D. Higley and J. Atwell, of the Thomson Meter Company; George A. Johnson, consulting hydraulic engineer; Allan W. Cuddeback, of Paterson, N. J.; Superintendent and Mrs. Alvin Bugbee, of Trenton, N. J.; W. H. Van Winkle, Jr., of the Water Works Equipment Company; representatives of the A. P. Smith Manufacturing Company; J. A. Kenle and party, representing the ElectroBleaching Gas Company; N. M. Borden, of the Simplex Valve and Meter Company; E. M. Hoopes, Jr., city engineer of Wilmington, Del.; S. M. Van Trump, engineer of water works, Wilmington, Del.; M. F. Tiernan, of the Wallace & Tiernan Company; Arthur Crane, of the New York Continental Jewell Filtration Company; D. T. Purdie, of the Builders Iron Foundry; Water Commissioner George W. Batchelder, of Worcester, Mass.; F. Kemble, of the New Rochelle, N. Y., Water Company; P. Tilden, of the Harrison Works, Philadelphia; I. S. Holbrook, of New York; M. M. Baker, of New York; Richard E. Brown, of New York, and a representative of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING. The Pittsburgh delegation left that city on Sunday afternoon, arriving in St. Louis on Monday morning.

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THE AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION CONVENTION

4

THE AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION CONVENTION

(Special Dispatch to FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING.)

Richmond Va., May 8, 1917.

Owing to the thorough work performed by the officers of the American Water Works Association the large attendance and perfect arrangements by the committees for the Richmond convention proved a surprise to many, and it looks at this time as if success had already perched upon its banners from all directions. The thirtyseventh annual convention of the Association has opened well. Yesterday many familiar faces were to be seen around the corridors of the Jefferson Hotel and a constant stream of applicants was registering and “settling up” at the secretary’s and treasurer’s desks. The program arranged for the meeting is the largest and most interesting of any other issued for a similar occasion so that it will take the constant attention of the members if it can be completed in the time set part for the business sessions, which is very doubtful. President Metcalf is an experienced presiding officer and may be expected to get through with the reading of papers and discussions in as short and satisfactory a manner as possible, but no one need be surprised if fifty per cent, of the papers must be passed over to be printed in the proceedings. John M. Diven, the smiling secretary, is still enthusiastically attending to his onerous duties, assisted by his well qualified assistant, Miss Edgley, while Professor Caird looks steadfastly after the flow of currency that keeps running into his capacious receiver. Two other members must be particularly mentioned here on account of the duties they have to perform in pleasing the large numbers that constantly seek their council, namely: D. B. McCarthy, chairman of the entertainment committee of the Manufacturers Association, and Burt. B. Hodgman, chairman of the exhibit committee. The convention hall in the palm garden of the Jefferson looks very well but there is scarcely room to make a big display. The exhibits, however, are of great interest in themselves and show a large variety of devices improved, up to date and arranged with great taste. A large number of representatives are in charge of the exhibits which is enough to say that all callers at the booths will receive the best and most intelligent service. The amusement end of the program contains ample entertainment for the visitors, especially the afternoon at the Golf Club where prizes will be offered for the best scores and as Mr. Charles R. Wood will direct the games, this feature of the convention must prove a great success. The Superintendent’s Day will afford an opportunity for practical water works men to discuss the methods employed in the operation of the plants of which they have charge. The subjects chosen are bound to prove of unusual interest and practical value to all who attend the sessions and it is to be hoped that the attendance at them will be so large that this feature will grow in importance and occupy the principal place on the program of the Association. A word about ourselves would not be out of place here, so it may be mentioned that the Special Convention issue of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING is a great success, the copies displayed at its booth being eagerly looked for when the exhibit opened this morning. It is a genuine souvenir edition from cover to cover and its popular features are still a big source of attraction. No other journal makes any effort to produce special issues for these conventions and FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING still holds its leading position in the water works field. Then our daily edition issued for the convention and placed in the hands of the members every morning is greatly appreciated to judge by the demand for copies. Another busy man is E. E. Davis, superintendent of water works and chairman of the local committee of arrangements. As he is very popularly known to most of the members, he was much in demand but was equal to the occasion with his good natured smile and met old friends and new with a pleasant greeting for all, from the first arrivals on Sunday until this time. As this meeting is being held in a Southern city, that of last year in New York, there is a strong current of feeling favorable to a western city for the 1918 convention and the claims of St. Louis are already being pushed prominently to the fore, although a number of other cities are mentioned. Among these are Birmingham, Ala.; Buafflo, N. Y.; Evansville, Ind.; Detroit, Mich.; New Haven, Conn., and Gulfport, Miss. A word about the good transportation facilities provided may be said in favor of the chairman of the committee, W. H. Van Winkle.

S.