The American Waterworks Association.

The American Waterworks Association.

President George H. Felix writes that the twenty-eighth annual convention of the American Water Works association will be held at Washington, D. C., on May 11-16, 1908. The assistance of every member is wanted to make this convention “a record breaker” in every way, particularly in the quality of the papers, attendance and increase in membership. The success of this feature of “experience papers” last year shows the desirability of continuing it. Every active member should contribute something—tell something of his practical experience in the operation of a waterworks, something on office details, special features of construction, difficult or unusual repairs, operating pumps and filter plants, etc., etc. But, while asking for short “experience papers,” the association still desires longer or more technical papers, and contributions will he thankfully received by the secretary. All papers should be in the hands of the secretary in time to be printed in the advance edition of papers—which this year should not he later than March 15. Duplicate copies of all papers should he sent to the secretary, and the writer should keep one copy, for use in correcting the proof of his paper, which will he sent to him before it is printed. The president asks that any legal decisions affecting the operation of a waterworks that have been rendered in cases affecting the works operated by the members or that they have knowledge of be sent to the secretary. Special State laws affecting waterworks are also desirbd. He writes that the increase in membership during the last two years has been gratifying and encouraging. It has more than doubled in the last five years, and is now 724. He adds: “We want to make it 1,000 this year, and, if each member will do his share, this can be accomplished. The net increase lastyear was 128; the year before 101; we can make it 276 this year and reach the 1,000 mark.” Application blanks are enclosed with the president’s appeal and more will be sent to members on request. He hopes they will make good use of them and try to secure at least one new member. “The field is large; there are nearly 4,000 waterworks in the United States and Canada—less than one-tenth is represented in the association— all should be. The association should have 4,000 members, rather than 1,000.” The president continues: “Washington is an ideal place for holding a convention, there is much to see, and the local committee is making elaborate preparations for our entertainment. Several excursions to points of interest will be arranged for. Especial effort will he made to make it pleasant for the ladies attending; in fact, nothing will be left undone to make it attractive for all who attend. Details of the local arrangements will he issued later. The hotel accommodations will be ample and good, and at reasonable rates. Excellent arrangements will be made for the exhibition of waterworks appliances. Enough good papers have already been promised to insure an attractive and instructive program. On the recommendation of the finance committee, the convention in Toronto voted unanimously to increase the annual dues of active members to $5 per year. This was not done with any idea of creating a permanent fund, paying salaries or providing entertainment for those who attend the conventions ; but solely to improve the work of the association, at the same time putting it and keeping it on a sound financial basis. The increased revenue is needed for many things—things that will he of advantage to every member. It is hoped that the members will concur unanimously in the action of the convention, and thereby help to advance the American Water Works association to a high place among the technical societies. Remember the date for the convention—May 1116, make your arrangements now to attend. Special railroad rates will be arranged for, and announced later. A full program of the proceedings and arrangements, and advance copy of papers to be presented will he sent to you in ample time before the convention. Secure your members now; it will cost them no more to join now than later; there will be no charge for dues for balance of this year—that is, dues paid with application will pay to April 15, 1909, and those applying now will receive copies of the 1907 proceedings.” The secretary’s address is, J. M. Diven, secretary, 14 George street, Charleston, S. C.

The Late Anthony P. Smith.

THE AMERICAN WATERWORKS ASSOCIATION,

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THE AMERICAN WATERWORKS ASSOCIATION,

L. N. Case. Duluth, Minn., president of the American Water Works association, has already started the ball rolling for the convention to be held in St. Louis. Mo., next year. In his address just issued be says: “It may be considered rather early to communicate with you in regard to matters that concern our next convention; but it is most desirable that you carry with you, during the year that intervenes, thoughts of bow to make our visit to St. Louis a most enjoyable and profitable one. This will rest largely with the members themselves. Tt was well that the question came up and was discussed at our meeting at Detroit, as to whether the World’s Fair would or would not be a distracting, disturbing influence upon the business of the convention. The members emphatically committed themselves to the negative side of the question, and there is not a doubt but that they will stand bv it, and that our meetings will be fully attended. The ouestion of whether it will be best for the success of the convention and the pleasure of the members to occupy the first three days entirely and exclusively in the transaction of business and take in the Fair afterwards, or break the session up into half days, half of which will be given to the Fair, is submitted for careful consideration. Postal cards will be sent you later in the year for an expression of your ideas upon this subject. The splendid results obtained last year in obtaining new members strongly influence the adoption of methods of a similar nature, one of which was to appeal urgently to every member, active and associate, to get at least one application. The opportunities are greater, and the inducements stronger now than those of last year, not only because of the fact that we are to attend the World’s Fair as a body, but because of the new life and enthusiasm that were inieeted into the association by the previous administration. Therefore, to make an Irish bull, to do as well as our predecessors did we must do much better, and it is earnestly honed that vou will all respond to this call made upon yon. And we want some good papers—papers upon snbiects that are of interest to us as waterworks men, and that will give us information. Do not think that any subject pertaining to our profession is worn threadbare, or that enough has been said about it! You are in daily study as to what is for the best interests of the plants under your influence or control. New difficulties are arising, and possibly, new solutions of old difficulties; let us have them.”