The Apulian Aqueduct in Italy

The Apulian Aqueduct in Italy

American Consular Agent Otto Schuck, at Bari, Italy, has prepared the following report regarding the construction of the Apulian Aqueduct in the southeastern part of that country, from which it appears appears that that bids bids are are now now being being accepted for large quantities of cast iron metal. The problem of supplying Apulia with an adequate water supply has been under consideration since the Roman times, but did not materialize until the new Italian Kingdom had been established. In 1904 a syndicate was formed between the Italian Government, the three Provinces of Bari, Foggia and Lecce, and the Apulian communities for the construction of the so-called Apulian aqueduct. The State contribution was fixed at $20,000,000; the share of the Apulian Provinces at $5,000,000. The execution of the work at the cost of $24,800,000 was intrusted by the syndicate to the engineering firm of Ercole, Antico & Co., which subsequently became the Societa Anonima Italiana Concessionaria dell’Acquedotto Pugliese. The head of the company is Senator Giovanni Bombrini, of Genoa. The work was begun in 1906 and should be ready, according to contract, by the end of 1916. About 1,450 gallons of water per second, or over 125,000,000 gallons every 24 hours, will be carried in long and difficult sloping tunnels from the Mediterranean to the Adriatic watershed, where they will be distributed to 268 communities, covering a territory of 7,500 square miles, with over 2,140,000 inhabitants. The length of the main pipe line from Caposele, in the Province of Avellino, to Alberobello, in the Province of Bari, will be 132 miles, of which 60 miles will be carried in tunnels, 64 miles in trenches, and 5 miles on bridges. The total length of the conduit will be about 1,560 miles, to which must be added 128 reservoirs. The main conduit, which is now almost completed, and the principal side lines consist of large cement pipes, while some 1,118 miles of cast iron pipes will be used for the minor conduits; 110,000 to 120,000 tons of cast iron conduit, diameter 5 1/2 to 90 centimeters, for delivery from 1914 to 1916, are said to be still open to contract, also 6 miles steel conduit, diameter 100 to 120 centimeters. Furthermore, about 4,000 floodgates (weight about 220 tons) and 2,000 small cast iron fountains, will be required, also large quantities of counters and Venturi water meters. Offers should be directed to the headquarters of the Societa Anonima ftaliana Concessionaria dell’Acquedotto Pugliese, at Genoa, where further particulars can be obtained.

The quantity of water to be supplied by the company varies from a maximum of 24 gallons per day an inhabitant in the large centers, Bari, fraction thereof in the minor places. The water for these fountains will be supplied at 11½ cents per 1,000 gallons, while individuals will have to pay 26½ cents per 1,000 gallons in the large centers to 14 cents per 1,000 gallons in the minor communities. Industries will get water at 6 to 16J i cents per 1,000 gallons, according to the importance of daily requirements. The quantity of water not required by the towns and other dwelling places can be used for irrigation at about 8 cents per 1,000 gallons. The constructing company has the right of exploiting the aqueduct for 90 years after completion of the work, but the concession can be redeemed by the syndicate after 30 years. The benefits of this gigantic undertaking will no doubt be enormous. Both agriculture and industry will be greatly stimulated, and Apulia is likely to become one of the healthiest and best cultivated parts of Italy.

[An illustrated pamphlet explaining in detail this important project, and showing the amount of work that has been accomplished up to the present year will be loaned on application to the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, Washington.]—Consul W. W. Handy at Naples.

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