The Bangor Water Department

The Bangor Water Department

The number of water services in Bangor, Me., at the close of the municipal year ending February 28, 1915, was 5,162, according to the Bangor Water Department’s fortieth annual report. Sixty-nine new were added during the year, 105 renewed and seven discontinued; 3,204 feet of new mains were laid, while 1,304 feet were relaid in larger sizes. The most important work at the pumping station this year, says the report, was the installation of a low-service centrifugal pump, which supplies raw water to the sedimentation basin, and has a pumping capacity of 10,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. The report says provision for a new standpipe ought to be seriously considered during the coming year and a definite plan agreed upon as to the location and size of this standpipe, so that, if possible, some beginning can be attempted toward the ultimate result, which is so essential for the safety of the service. The question of fire protection must be taken into consideration in connection with this matter and the necessity for this improvement will be plainly evident. The total amount of water delivered to consumers during the year was 1,394,427,000 gallons, or an average per day of 3,820,000 gallons, a decrease of 4 per cent, from last year. The cash receipts for the year were $89,270.43 and with the revenue for water from all sources, $103,242.02. Superintendent Melville A. Sinclair, in his report to the board, said: “Our pumping system has been strengthened by installing a low-service centrifugal pump which supplies raw water to the sedimentation basin. This pump is arranged to be driven by electric motor, steam turbine, or water power, and has a pumping capacity of 10,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. The receipts amounted to $106,376.13. Street maintenance cost, $13,933.25: office account, $1,351.44; street construction, $7,761.47; salaries, $2,815.74; pumping station maintenance, $11,805.98; plant maintenance, $10,258.51; plant construction, $1,312.86; plant, new machinery, $5,399.00; and piers, $1,934.37. The amount of water pumped was 1,396,736,700 gallons. The report contains a review of the operation of the filter plant for the year by Professor James M. Caird, chemist and bacteriologist, in which he says in part: “The water supply for Bangor has been obtained from the Penobscot River since 1876, at which time the original pumps were placed in operation. The Penobscot river has a drainage area of about 7,700 sq. miles above the water works intake. The water is highly colored, carries little or no turbidity but some pollution, due to sewage from several localities, waste from the pulp mills and drainage from numerous farms. The new filter plant was placed in operation Feb. 6, 1911. and consisted of six filter units. In 1912 the plant was increased by the equipment of two blank units, so that at the present time the plant consists of eight units with a total of 3,407 square feet. The capacity of the plant is 8,000,000 gallons per day. but this rate can be greatly exceeded for short periods. There has been no trouble from mechanical causes since this plant was placed in operation. Since the coagulant has been used, there has been a reduction of 67.5 per cent, in the local deaths from typhoid fever; this does not take into consideration the increase in population during this time.

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