The Boston High Pressure System

The Boston High Pressure System

The high water pressure system of Boston, Mass., is. it is said, in such condition that no one can predict what might happen if it were called into play in case of a conflagraation. Not one section of the entire system, according to J. A. Rourke, engineer in charge of the high pressure system, comes up to the specifications as to leakage. He said: “In the first place there are many dead ends where there should be none. In the second place the hydrant valves are not properly tied to the mains, with the result that they are in a weak state. I have been obliged to order 19 openings in the streets to date, at times making holes in newly permanently paved streets, while the contractors have made many openings, and the end is not vet. It appears that in some instances the con ractors were not called upon to test the pipes at all, while in others the test was limited to 300 pounds per square inch instead of 400 pounds. Whereas it was stipulated in the original specifications that not more than one-half gallon per lineal foot of joint should be allowed to leak in 24 hours, I have found in one instance a leakage amount ng to more than 15 gallons per lineal foot of joint. The city will not be obliged to stand the expense of the openings made by the contractors because they have not lived up to their contracts. It will, however, have to stand the expense of the 19 openings which are to follow’, made l:y our own men. The contractors were paid for that w’ork and that closed the issue. There is just one portion of the system which I will stand behind, and that is the 2,500 feet Which has been laid since I took charge of the service last November Every point in this stretch was tested before it was covered with earth.”

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