The Brockton Fire Department

The Brockton Fire Department

The report for the year ending November 30, 1915, by the chief engineer of the Brockton, Mass., fire department, the late Chief Harry L. Marston, who upon his death was succeeded as chief by William F. Daley, has been issued in book form and shows the fire alarms for the year were: First alarms, 177; second alarms, 4; general alarms, 1; automatic alarms, 73; still alarms, 52; telephone alarms, 365; reported fires, 94; total, 766. The fires and alarms each month were: December, 1914, 53; January, 1915, 49; February, 61; March, 174; April, ill; May, 64; June, 58; July, 45; August. 21; September, 39; October, 39; November, 54. The estimated value of the property where fires occurred, including buildings and contents, was $4,560,091. The insurance on same was $3,574,485.92 and the loss on same was only $63,018.20. The insurance paid on same was $92,079.95. In performing this service the apparatus travelled 2,418.61 miles, laid 52,000 feet of 254-inch and 3-inch hose, and 31.630 feet of chemical hose, raised 3,815 feet of ladders, charged 213 tanks of chemical, used 286 pony chemicals, used 5,765 gallons of chemicals and 10.5 quarts of Pyrene. The time of service at fires was 431 hours, 5 minutes. Members of the department made 1,016 inspections of blocks, cellars, yards, etc., for the purpose of keeping them clear of rubbish and inflammable material for the purpose of bettering the fire conditions and preventing fires. The apparatus in service in the Brockton fire department, on November 30, 1915, according to the report, was: Two Amoskeag engines, second class, one horse-drawn, one with A and B tractor, one Clapp & Jones engine, second class; two Westinghouse gasoline engines; one La-France engine, extra first class, in reserve; one American-La France aerial truck and portable water tower, drawn by tractor; one Babcock aerial truck, with Dahill hoist, drawn by tractor; one Rumsey city truck; one double (60 gallon) tank Babcockchemical engine, horse drawn; six two-horse supply wagons; two hand reels; six motor combination, chemical and hose wagons, one for “Squad A,” the others run in connection with the engine companies, each carrying a complement of ladders; one auto for Chief; one auto for fire alarm and inspection work; one Gleason & Bailey truck in reserve; one two-horse hose wagon in reserve, and two for sale; two double (60 gallon) tank chemical engines in reserve; one sleigh. There were in service 15 horses. During the year 7 were sold and one killed. There was in service 11,100 feet of 254-inch hose and 1,850 feet of 3-inch hose, all cotton rubber lined. During the year 2,100 feet of 254-inch hose cotton rubber lined was purchased. The permanent force consisted of 74 men. During the year one died, seven were appointed from the call force, and one. a machinist, was appointed from outside. The call force, after tbe above appointments were made, was disbanded on June 30th, 1915. In the report Chief Marston recommended that a new station be built at Centreville, and equipped with motor apparatus; that horse drawn engines should be replaced with motor engines, saying; “I would recommend that $10,000 per year be appropriated for four years which would completely motorize the department;” that tbe second fire district be extended and the fire or building ordinance thoroughly revised.

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