The Brooklyn High-Pressure System.

The Brooklyn High-Pressure System.

The high-pressure water system for the protection of the borough of Brooklyn, New York, from fire comprises approximately 5 miles of 20-in. pipe, 6 miles of 16-in. pipe, 10 miles of 12-in. pipe and 1 1/2 miles of 8-in. pipe—a total mileage of pipe of more than 22 miles. To control these pipe lines properly, there are 68 20-in., 94 16-in., 140 12-in. and 705 8-in. gate-valves. T here are 681 hvdrants and 24 fireboat-connections. Service-mains are cross-connected in such a manner that, in the event of a break, repairs may be made without affecting any hydrants, except those located in the block in which the break occurs and without appreciably affecting the supply or pressure on the remainder. The territory covered by this system extends along the East river waterfront from the Erie basin to the Navy yard, including the downtown business section— a total area of approximately 1,360 acres, with mains extending approximately 3 miles and over a width of from a few hundred feet up to I mile at the widest point. The section is bounded by the East river, Navy yard, Nassau, Prince, Johnston, and St. Edward’s streets; Flatbush avenue, Dean, Clinton, Harrison, Henry, Third, Columbia, Dwight, Walcott and Richard streets and the Erie basin. The pumping machinery is adapted for salt or fresh water. Each pump has a capacity of 3,000 gal. a minute, when pumping against a pressure of 300 lb. per sq. in. The pressure may be regulated at each pump by means of a valve. At the reserve station there are three such pumps. The capacity of the main station is thus equivalent to 30 fire-streams, or 500 gal. a minute each—approximately 22,000,000 gal. a day. The capacity of the reserve station is 18 fire-streams—500 gal. per minute each—or approximately 13,000,000 gal. a day. Provision has been made at each station for the installation of three additional units, if desired. The various Parts of the pumps and motors arc interchangeable, and worn parts may be easily replaced, a minimum amount of time being required to make repairs. The pumps are of the multi-stage, turbine type, of 6 stages, the water entering at one end of the pump, being discharged at the last stage, or opposite end of the pump, the pressure for each stage amounting to 117 ft. The current for operating the motors which drive the pumps is 3-phase, 25-cycle of 6,000 volts. A private telephone service has been established in connection with the operation of the high-pressure fire-service system. This will include a private tic-line between the two switchboards in the two pumping stations and one central-office line from each of the switchboards; a private line from each pumping station to the switchboard of the Edison Electric Illuminating company; a private line from each pumping station to the switchboard at fire headquarters; lines from telephone call-boxes, located near the fire-alarm signal boxes, to the switchboards in the stations. Six call-boxes will be located on the wires to the nearest central office. It is estimated that the cost of maintenance and operation of the system will be $150,coo. Meanwhile, Manhattan, whose’ system was to be in working order on April 1, still maintains her expectant attitude.

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