THE BROOKLYN WATER SUPPLY.

THE BROOKLYN WATER SUPPLY.

Engineer De Varona’s annual report on the water supply of Brooklyn has been published and is an unusually long document, containing much information which has already been supplied to the public by the city works department and FIRE AND WATER. It states that the water revenue for the financial year just gone by amounted to §1,953,754.24. After all expenditures a large balance remained, which was transferred to the sinking fund. The water construction account revealed that only $197,693.11 remained on hand in the treasury, and that by the sale of bonds already authorized there should be available $1,220,812.98.

In the last three years the average daily supply of Ridgewood water has been respectively, 71,360,074 gallons, 75,535,022 gallons, and 80,961,149 gallons. Persons who have worried lest the foreign substances in the water should increase the death rate from typhoid fever, will be interested to see the following table, which shows that such fears are apparently groundless:

Other paragraphs in the report deal with the necessity for an increased supply and give suggestions for the present supply.

The Brooklyn Water Supply.

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The Brooklyn Water Supply.

JOHN P. ADAMS, commissioner of department of city works of Brooklyn, appreciates the situation of the growing demands of the city for more pumping capacity. The Board of Aldermen, however, do not seem to be in a hurry. Pumps cannot be bought and placed in position at once. The water and drainage committee of the Board of Aldermen seem to think that there need be no hurry about the matter. The time may come when the people of Brooklyn may take it into their heads, that so far as the progress, growth and development of the city’s interest are concerned, that the Board of Aldermen are a hindrance and that there is no further need of their services. In fact, when public sentiment really wakes up to the perilous condition of the city regarding her water supply, a change may take place of such a radical character that the people will really wonder why it did not take place long ago. If it had taken place some time ago no particular harm would have ensued. There are some people in Brooklyn that begin to think that there is no need of a Board of Aldermen, particularly of the present kind, that are so wonderfully lax in official duty.

Brooklyn’s necessities in the way of an ample water supply has more than once been made the sport and foot ball of the Board of Aldermen.