THE BYRAM RIVER CASE.

THE BYRAM RIVER CASE.

The recent decision of the Supreme Court of the United States as to the right of New York city to use the water of the Byram river seems to be interpreted as indicating the right of the city to take for its own use the water of the Ten Mile river, subject, of course, as in the other case, to payment of suitable indemnity to property owners who may suffer actual damage because of such diversion of the water. If this is so, then there is practically open to the water department of New York a con siderable water supply being close at hand, obtain able quickly and with the least expense of any hitherto proposed. The Ten Mile watershed lies just north of the Croton, touching the latter at Pawling. It covers about 200 square miles of land, and can easily furnish 150,000,000 gallons a day, or one-half as much as the entire Croton system. Little work would be needed to secure this. A dam would be needed at YVebatuck and another small one at Pawling. Through the sluiceway of the latter the water from the Ten Mile river would flow by gravity into the east branch of the Croton, and thence down to Croton lake and through the existing aqueducts to New York. Probably the aqueducts would have to be enlarged to carry it all. They have a maximum capacity of about 380.000,000 gallons a day. When the Cornell dam is finished, the present Croton system will furnish 300,000,000 gallons a day. and the addition of the Ten Mile river supply would raise that amount to 450,000,000 gallons. The present cost of Croton water would also be reduced from a little more than $25 to $20 per million gallons. From the Ten Mile river, with generous allowances for condemnation and indemnity proceedings, it is claimed that the cost would Ire less than $10—not more than half as much as that from any other source that is available Of course, if the upper Housatonic river supply could be obtainable, which is doubtful, as it lies east of the Connecticut State line, and, therefore, could not be drawn upon without the consent of that State, the united gravity flow of the Ten Mile river and the Housatonic river would be 800.000,coo gallons a day at a cost of not more than $10 per million.

The State geological survey of New’ Jersey, prepared by John C. Smock, former State geologist, strongly urges State ownership and care of the forests, so as to hinder as much as possible their destruction by fire. This, he points out, is necessary not only to aid in the material development and colonisation of the State, but also for the conservation of the water supply in the pine belt, which, if properly stored, would give 600,000,000 gallons daily—enough to satisfy the wants of 5,000,000 people.’ If utilised, it should be able to furnish Phildelphia. Camden, and the suburbs of the latter city with a water of pronounced medical value.

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