The Canandaigua Water Supply

The Canandaigua Water Supply

In inspection of the sources of the Canandaigua, N. Y., water supply was recently made by District Sanitary Supervisor Isaac W. Brewer. Chief Engineer Theodore Horton, of the State Department of Health, has now submitted the report on the water supply, which is, in part, as follows: “The water supply of Canandaigua is pumped from Canandaigua lake at a point two miles south of the city and is distributed by gravity from a reservoir about one-half mile west of the pumping staiton. The intake consists of a 16-inch pipe extending about 500 feet from shore in 50 feet of water. Canandaigua lake has a surface area of 16 square miles and the total watershed area tributary to it is approximately 172 miles. There are several small villages located upon this watershed and a great many scattered farm houses. In addition numerous summer cottages are scattered along the shores of the lake. The total population upon the watershed has been estimated at approximately 6,500, or 38 per square mile. At the time of Dr. Brewer’s inspection he found that the sanitary conditions along the shores of the lake were very good. At one or two points near the head of the lake there are privies which are liable to drain into the waters of the lake. The owners, however, have undertaken to relocate them so that_ there will be no danger of contamination of the lake water. There is a large summer population in the vicinity of the lake and its waters. There are steamers which ply upon the lake but these are provided with water-tight compartments connected with the toilets. The contents of these compartments are not discharged into the lake but into its outlet.” Conclusions drawn from the report and recommendations by the chief engineer are: “1—’That the board of public works has apparently taken steps to eliminate the chief sources of direct contamination of their water supply. 2—That the supply derived from Canandaigua lake while in the main of a good sanitary and aesthetic quality, is open to intermittent contamination due to the use of the lake and shores for pleasure purposes as well as to general contamination from a populated watershed.” Among the recommendations are these: “That the city authorities continue their efforts to reduce the number of permanent sources of contamination. That in case any difficulty be experienced in carrying out the above recommendation or if it be deemed advisable as a precautionary measure to prevent additional contamination in the future the city authorities apply to this department for the enactment of rules and regulations for the sanitary protection of the waters of the lake. That in view of the always present possibility of accidental or wilful contamination of the water of the lake in the immediate vicinity of the intake, and that active contamination has occurred is evidenced by the analyses, the city should install and operate suitable apparatus for the sterilization of the supply with liquid chlorine. In case such apparatus is installed it should at all times be carefully operated and, if possible, under the supervision of a competent expert.” In a letter accompanying the report Commissioner Biggs wrote: “A report on a previous inspection was submitted to your board in 1909. I am pleased to learn from this later report that your board has apparently taken steps to control the sources of contamination of the water supply, although I note that there are. other further improvements that are very desirable.”

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