THE COSMOPOLITAN ENGINE.

THE COSMOPOLITAN ENGINE.

It will be remembered that at the convention of fire engineers held in New York city last year a small steamer was tested and the trials proved of much interest. It was the first time the bantam engine made its appearance, and there was some doubt as to its usefulness, until the machine demonstrated what it could perform. It was tested for throwing one and two streams horizontally and vertically, and the general impression was that for small cities and towns the newcomer would fill a long-felt want. The cosmopolitan is six feet five inches long, without tongue, three feet eight inches wide, and six feet two inches high. It weighs 1,675 pounds empty and 1.925 pounds with water and fuel. The pumps and cylinders are double; bore of the steam cylinders is three and one-half inches; stroke. four inches; pumps have a bore of two and one-half inches and a four-inch stroke; rated capacity is 200 gallons a minute. The boiler is of the fire-tube type, twenty inches in diameter by forty inches high, and is not jacketed, but covered with fine black enamel finish. The engine has one two-and-one half-inch outlet, and a Siamese is used for two streams. It has a suction two and one-half inches in diameter and sixteen feet long. With a steam pressure of 140 pounds and seventy-five water pressure, through 500 feet of two and one-half-inch hose, this little giant throws two streams of water, with five-eighth nozzles, ninety feet horizontal and seventy-five feet vertical. It can be worked by almost anyone possessed of ordinary intelligence, and its cost is within the purchasing power of any municipality. The Cosmopolitan is built by the American Eire Engine company, Seneca Falls, N. Y.

COSMOPOLITAN FIRE ENGINE.

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