The Danvers Water Department

The Danvers Water Department

Superintendent Henry Newhall, of the Danvers, Mass., water department, in his annual report for 1917, says good progress had been made in the work of resurveying services and that it would be finished that season. Relative to hydrants, he comments that hydrants were made for fire service only, “but ours are used by others ten times as much as by the fire department. This handling by inexperienced persons causes a great expense.” He also states the Summer was very dry and “we pumped an enormous amount of w ater, over 140 gallons per day for every man, woman and child. This shows that it was not used legitimately. Many who paid for a $3.00 hose used it for market gardens and on overtime, in spite of the regulations, and we found many who paid nothing doing the same. With the present high price and shortage of coal this will have to be stopped.” Water receipts during the year were $26,715.35. Meter receipts amounted to $15,004.80; interest to $110.03 and balance from 1916, $20,551.64; making a total of $62,381.82. Construction cost $16,171.97. The number of services laid in 1917 was 32. The number previously reported was $2,529. The amount of pipe laid by the town in 1917 was 1,495 feet 4 inches, and the amount laid for consumers was 1,227 feet and 11 inches. Total expenditures, including payroll, amounted to the sum of $58,949.91.

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