The Denver Department’s Force Reduced.

The Denver Department’s Force Reduced.

The dismissal of 22 men from the force by the Fire and Police Board of Denver, Col., “to keep within the appropriation,” has cut the fire crews down to a very small number, and has necessitated the abandonment of two steamers and three hose wagons, leaving some portions of the city practically unprotected. Chief Roberts has, in consequence of the depletion of his force, withdrawn men from the resident portions of the city in order to protect the business districts, and the former are practically unprotected against fire. Steamers 7 and 8, with their hose wagons, are abandoned, one man lieii.g left with each to guard the property, thus crippling the service in the southwestern part of the city. The hose company’s house in South Denver has also been abandoned. The men who were stationed at the abandoned houses are scattered over the city to fill the vacancies caused by the action of the board. The crews of hook and ladder companies have been reduced from ten to eight men, hose wagons from five to four men, and engines from nine to eight. This leaves barely enough men to operate the apparatus. At certain hours of the day wagons are left with very small crews. During the three meal hours and when any man is given a day off, there are but two men remaining in the houses to work the hose. If a big fire should occur with half the force scattered about for dinner, the only possible way to work the engines would be to desert some of them and combine the weakened forces upon what could be utilized until the scattered crews could be collected. Close on this reduction comes the threat by the Fire and Police Board that unless the city council shall appropriate additional funds for the fire department, twenty-five more men shall be dismissed within a week. Such a reduction would be equivalent practically to an abandonment of the department.

Geoige B. Bassett, of Buffalo, N. Y., has been engaged as engineer by the Village of LeRoy, N. Y., to locate if possible a new supply for the Waterworks the many salt wells and salt mines in the vicinity of the village having tendered Oatka Creek, the present source of supply, too salt for domestic use. lie is now sinking test wells for an under ground supply about one mile southeast of the village with reasonable prospects of success.

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