The Detection of Waste

The Detection of Waste

Like the poor, the problem of waste is always with us. The detection of this waste in its various forms is one of the big problems that engage the attention of the water works superintendent in practically every city and town in the land. Those who are fortunate enough to have their services entirely metered have less worry on this score, perhaps, but even with this class there is already the question of leaks from mains and joints, electrolysis, and so on.

Tied up with this question of waste is the matter of the coal pile. The more water wasted, the more must be pumped, and the more water pumped the faster will the coal pile diminish. The two papers published in this week’s issue of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING therefore, hinge on each other and are interrelated. Mr. Bankson shows the relation of the control of various forms of leakage and water waste to water works economy and Mr. Maxwell points out the necessity in economy of coal consumption and how it is dependent upon the care and upkeep of the distribution system, as well as upon efficient methods in the boiler room and pumping station. Both papers deal with different phases of the same problems and deserve careful reading on the part of superintendents.

No posts to display