THE EAST RIVER ON FIRE.

THE EAST RIVER ON FIRE.

At the foot of Sixty-fifth street, North River, this city, the Standard Oil Company have storage tanks for crude petroleum, delivered there by the railroad trains. The greater portion of it is passed through a pipe about three miles long, passing under the streets of the city to the East River, and then under the river to the distilleries at Hunter’s Point. Through this pipe the oil is forced by a steam pump.

On Sunday morning, April 20, the pipe burst on the bottom of the river, and the oil and water rose like a water-spout, covering the river with petroleum, which spread in all directions, and was carried down the stream by the ebbing tide. From some cause the oil took fire along the river front, and in a moment the New York shore was in a blaze; fortunately there were scarcely any vessels on the river, but one of the docks took fire, which was promptly extinguished by the Firemen. The oil, of course, could not be extinguished, and burned until it was consumed. The quantity on the water was spread over such a large surface that it did not burn long, but the flames shot up here and there as they traveled rapidly from one floating quantity of oil to another. When the fire reached the spot over the leak it remained confined there and burned for four hours. No serious damage resulted, some vessels and fences and trees alone the line being only slightly scorched. The most serious damage was to the dock on the New York shore.

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