THE ELECTRIC LIGHT AT SEA.

THE ELECTRIC LIGHT AT SEA.

The electric light has been very prominent during the present naval manoeuvres, and although accounts somewhat differ as to its actual value, there can be no doubt that it is one of the indispensable adjuncts to a modern man-of-war. Some complaints have been made that the lookout men are so dazzled by the beam that they are unable to keep as sharp a watch as is necessary in directions which are not at the moment illuminated. On the other hand, this dazzling effect was turned to a good use during the naval manoeuvres of last year, when the gunners manning the guns in the Pembroke Dock forts were rendered almost blind every now and again by the attacking ships skillfully flashing the light full in their faces, and during the interval of darkness moving rapidly to another point. This year Admiral Tryon made clever use of the electric light in a manner which recalls a somewhat similar use made by the French in their attack on Sfax. Unable to approach the forts near enough to deliver an effective fire, the French admiral placed his Hotchkiss quick-firing shellguns on board his small boats, and as soon as it was dark sent them to attack the enemy at close quarters. He then threw the strongest possible light upon the forts, and the small boats moving ahead in the darkness just beyond the flashes of light, came in close to the forts and poured in a deadly fire. The defenders, completely bewildered, capitulated soon after daylight. As another instance of the extensive use of electricity aboard ship, I mav mention that the Cape mail steamer Norham Castle, which has just been refined with the electric light, has been provided with a submarine lamp, by means of which the hull and propeller can be easily examined.— London Cor. Electrical World.

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