The Enlarged Filter Plant at Atlanta.

The Enlarged Filter Plant at Atlanta.

The New York Continental Jewell Filtration Company of New York recently completed an extensive addition to the filtration plant of Atlanta, Ga. It consisted of 20 units of 500,000 gallons each of the New York sectional wash filters. The addition of these filters raises the total capacity of the plant to 21,000,000 gallons per day. The plant includes a battery of 12 Hyatt filters installed in 1887. They are of the vertical pressure type with a daily capacity of 3,000,000 gallons. In 1802 the system was extended by the addition of a 4,000,000 gallon New York horizontal pressure tilted plant with sectional wash and this was duplicated at a late period. In 1895 the Hyatt filters were placed alongside the New York filters and gave the plant a nominal total opacity of 11,000,000 gallons. In 1910 the company was awarded a contract for the 20 units, increasing the plant by 10,000,000 gallons more or an aggregate of 21,000,000 daily. These filters arc operated as mechanical gravity filters under a pressure of front 8 to 15 pounds. From a local source the following data in relation to the waterworks plant of the city is taken. The water supply of Atlanta is from the Chattahoochee river, pumped into a storage reservoir of 178,000,000 gallons capacity, which with a new reservoir of 250,000,000 gives a total storage of 428,000,000 gallons. The water flows into two coagulating basins of 1,500,000 gallons each and thence to the filters. The new coagulating basins constructed increases the capacity to 6,000,000 gallons. Located at the C hattahoochee pumping station are three pumping engines of the horizontal compound crank and flywheel type, constructed by the Holly Manufacturing Company, with a maximum capacity of 38,000,000 gallons per day. The average daily pumpage from this station is 15,000,000 gallons. At the Hemphill No. 2 pumping station are three engines of the same type with a daily capacity of 35,000,000 gallons and one vertical triple expansion pumping engine constructed by the Wisconsin Engine Company with a capacity of 20,000,000 gallons, which gives the plant a total of 55,000,000 gallons. The average daily pumpage from this station is 13,600,000 gallons. The filter plant completed by the New York Continental Jewell Filtration Company adds another to the long list of mechanical systems installed by this company that are in effective operation in the United States and foreign countries. The Atlanta plant has been in successful operation for so many years removing suspended matter, cleansing and purifying the highly colored water of the Chattahoochee river that it is a very strong argument in favor of this system of filtration.

The International Association of Fire Engineers has elected the following chiefs as directors for the ensuing year: A. V. Bennett, of Birmingham. Ala.; J. Q. Hawk, of Moline. Ill.; and Howard L. Stanton, of Norwich, Conn

No posts to display