THE FIRE BOAT SERVICE OF DETROIT

THE FIRE BOAT SERVICE OF DETROIT

Detroit, as is well known, has one of the most progressive fire departments in the country. it is equipped with all modern apparatus and under the direction of Chief Broderick, its management and the discipline observed by its members places it well in advance of the best in the land. Although the city has a limited water front, its protection has been well attended to as the following brief mention of its fire boat service will show. The principal boat in service is the James Battle, whose pumps have a daily capacity of 7,500 gallons a minute. It has two turret nozzles, one on top of the pilot house and the other aft. This boat is stationed at the foot of Sixth street and is manned by ten to twelve men. The two turret nozzles throw 4-inch streams each a distance of too feet; 3,500 gallons each per minute or 58 1-3 gallons a second. In addition to these principal nozzles there are 20 others of different diameters, which may be used together or separately as desired. Of the two boats in commission, the Battle is the larger, beirig 122 feet long, 25 feet wide and draws 13 feet of water. It has a tonnage of 198. The William Elliott has a capacity of 0,500 gallons a minute. It is berthed at the foot of Campatt avenue and is first to answer alarms from that section of the city. Its length is 110 feet, width 25 feet and depth 12 feet, with a tonnage of 210. The boats are constructed much along the same lines, consequently there >⅛ little difference in their appearance, but the Elliott 1ms only one big nozzle in the bow and none aft. The Battle has a speed of 17 miles an hour, and it carries a regular equipment of 5,000 feet of hose and 50 to GO tons of soft coal. The boats also are used to furnish water to city mains. The 3 1/2-inch and 2 1/2-inch hose they carry is connected to the plugs at the river and water is pumped through the mains its far as 1,700 yards from the water front, furnishing ample pressure for fire extinguishment. The large plugs at the river front have six outlets and they arc connected to cast iron mains of 10 inches in diameter, and the 3½inch fire hose is used to pump into them. The crew of the James Battle has a record of 16 seconds for casting off ready to start and running 50 feet. The regular time for this boat is from 16 to 20 seconds, according to the number of the alarm. From this brief account of the fireboat service of the city, it will be seen that the protection of property on the water line is well maintained as is that of the buildings within a mile of the river front. Illustrations of the James Battle, made especially for EIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING from original photographs by Fred. G. Wright, Detroit.

THE JAMES BATTLE ANSWERING ALARM AT FULL SPEED.CREW OF THE JAMES BATTLE. From left to right: Capt. Morrison on steps; Lieut. T. J. Noves; G. F. Moore: F. Ponting; M. Keenoy, Cadet; E. Talbot, third officerl; H. L. McGowan; A. Roach and D. H. Carter.

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