The Fire Loss of Newark Smallest in Years, is Report

The Fire Loss of Newark Smallest in Years, is Report

Fire losses in Newark, N. J., in 1917 were $645,716, representing the lowest annual loss in years. Figures for the year show the total damage amounted to $225,970 less than 1916 losses, although there were 165 more alarms answered by the fire department. Director Brennan of the department of public safety declared that the decreased losses were due mainly to the close co-operation exercised between the fire department, the bureau of combustibles and fire risks and the building department. The effectiveness of the educational campaigning by the fire prevention bureau, under Gaptam C. Albert Gasser, is shown m the ngures, said the director. Regarding the elncieucy of the fire department under Chief Paul J. Moore, the director pointed out that 720 tires during tile year were caught in their incipiency and extinguished with chemical streams only. “From talks with the heads of departments,” said the dilector, “1 learn tiiat Newark is beginning to realize the value ol the work ol the public safety departments and that the people appreciate the positive need of co-operating vigilance on their own part every hour of the day. The remarkably small fire losses during the year is the best proof of the lire department’s efficiency, for with more alarms than in pievious years the losses have been nearly a quarter of a million dollars less tnan a year ago. To improve even this high standard will be the aim of the department of public safety for 1918.” During 1917 the fire department responded to 2,007 alarms as against 1,642 alarms in 1916. Of these 224 were false alarms. A total of 1,115 fires were extinguished by tne firemen, while the remaining number of alarms, 668, were for fires that were put out before the firemen arrived, i Here were twelve second-alarm fires, the uepartment used the low pressure water supply 562 times and the high pressure on 156 occasions; 5,422 lengths of hose were brought into use, 984 extinguishers and 6,768 feet of ladders. There are now 611 men in the department. At the beginning of 1914 there were 472 members of the fire-fighting force, but the adoption of the two-platoon system increased ttie roster by 173 men. Two men were retired, six resigned and two died during tiie year. The department has added six pieces of apparatus at a total cost ol $37,419. During the year the old fire board spent $11,000 for seven new boilers for steam engines, $15,900 for three squad company machines, which have not yet been delivered, and $1,500 for two passenger automobiles for the five battalion chiefs. The year’s cost of maintenance tor the department was $835,000.

Charles S. Miller has been appointed chief of the Glen Cove, N. Y., fire department, to succeed Martin F. Murray, resigned.

Members of the Allentown, Pa., fire department have organized a firemen’s i elief organization. The object of the association will be the general improvement of the fire service, affording relief to disabled firemen and to those who are dependent on them, and providing for sick and death benefits for members of the organization. Efforts will also be made to promote a fraternal spirit among the members of the department.

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