THE “ GLAMORGAN ” FIRE HYDRANT.

THE “ GLAMORGAN ” FIRE HYDRANT.

The “Glamorgan ” Fire Hydrant was placed on the market a little more than a year ago by M. J. Drummond & Co., 192 Broadway, New York, and Monadnock block, Chicago It is of the ” compression ” type, as will be seen by the illustration, and is said to possess all the essential features demanded by modern water works practice—namely, simplicity, durability and easy access to all the working parts. The main valve is of the form commonly used in this type of hydrant and is made either of leather or rubber, as preferred. The wast valve is of solid brass, positive in action, and is operated directly from the main valve, being opened by the first and closed by the last turn of the wrench in opening and closing the mtinvilve. Water is admitted to the waste valve chamber through six one-quarter inch holes, any one of which would drain the hydrant if five became clogged. These holes act as a strainer, and any impediment which can pass one of them can easily pass through the valve, thus avoiding any possibility of the waste becoming clogged. It drains close down to the main valve, leaving practically no water in the standpipe. The standpipe is secured in the outer case by six bolts at the pavement level, and a watertight joint is made below the main valve-seat by a rubber gasket fitting in the seat cast in the bottom of the outer case. To remove the same, it is only necessary to loosen the nuts of the bolts at the pavement level and turn the standpipe slightly, until the bolt heads come In the slots cast in the Inward projecting tlange at the top of the outer case —being thus free, it can be lifted to the surface of the ground. By slacking back the main valve nut on the top of the hydrant, the valve, valve seat, waste valve, and seat can be readily examined and repaired, if neces sary. The nozzles can be ‘urned to face in any desired direction by loosening nuts at pavement level and turning the standpipe. The double case of this hydrant renders it fros*proof, without the extra cos*, of a frost case. All the parts are interchangeable.

The implement nozzle cut-off consists of a tubular casting A, leaded into the standpipe of a hydrant, with its closed end projecting inside the water-way, a tubular gate piece adapted to slide longitudinally inside the casing, and an annular ring, or sleeve, B, mounted loosely on thecasing outside the standpipe. The casing, A, is provided with a series of ports, or holes, a. a, etc., near the closed end, for the admission of wat r to its interior. The tubular gate piece, when forced against a leather seat contained in the head or end piece, b, covers ports, a, a, etc., and excludes water from the interior of the valve and consequent passage to the hose line. The ring sleeve, B, is provided with lugs, or spuds, c, r, etc., on its outside, and threads on its inside to engage corresponding threads on the tubular gate piece, so that’by rotation of the sleeve the gite piece is withdrawn from its seat and the ports uncovered so as to allow a flow of water through the nozzle to the hose line, and by opposite rotation the ports are closed. Among its noticeable points are the following: (1) The valve is comp’ete within itself and involves no part of the hydrant, except where it is leaded in—consequently.it can be applied to any Drummond standard hydrant at any time, if not ordered at first; (2) it is a balanced valve by reason of its form, thus rendering its operation easy and without strain on any of its parts; (3) it is-designed to be operated by the same spanner wrench with which the hose coupling is attached and which is always conveniently at hand—in case no wrench can be secured the ring, B, can be easily rotated with the hands and the valve opened or closed ; (4) it does not leak.

M. J. DRUMMOND, GLAMORGAN FIRE HYDRANT,

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