THE GRAND RAPIDS FILTERED WATER.

THE GRAND RAPIDS FILTERED WATER.

Walter Sperry, manager of the Grand Rapids, Mich., filtration plant, recently spoke at BayCity and he stated that the citizens of Grand Rapids are paying only 6.6 cents per 1,000 gallons for filtered water, perfectly safe to drink, freed from a large part of the lime content which is found in all lake and river water, and from which the disease germs, which cause typhoid, dysentery, etc., have been removed. People of Bay City pay 10 cents per 1,000 gallons for water pumped largely from Saginaw river, containing a solution of all the sewage of Bay City, Saginaw, Flint and smaller towns on the river and its tributaries, frequently so thick with suspended mud, etc., that one can scarcely see the bottom of a pail filled with the water, almost too dirty to take a hath in at times and always unsafe for drinking or other domestic use unless boiled r treated with chlorine or other chemicals for the purpose of killing the disease germs. People in Grand Rapids drink the water from the taps in their house. Bay Cityans either buy bottled water to drink or they get it from a deep well which may he anywhere from half a block to half a mile from their homes. Manager Sperry illustrated his talk with slides, showing the process of filtration, and containing statistics of the results of using filcred and non-filtered water. These glides gave facts which have been polished many times, showing the great reduction in cases of typhoid fever and other less dangerous diseases, after a community has installed a pure water system, and it was stated as a fact ascertained by careful investigation that for every life which is saved by the elimination of typhoid through the furnishing of pure water, from one to three lives are saved by the elimination of other diseases. Mr. Sperry said that the cost of operation of the filtration plant in Grand Rapids is about $45,000 to $50,000 per year, and it costs $10 to $12 to treat and filter each million gallons of water pumped. The Grand Rapids filtration plant cost the city about $450,000 and has a capacity of 20,000,000 gallons per day with an overload capacity which can be maintained for a short period, at the rate of 25,000,000 gallons per day, and he recommended that Bay City, in view of the probability of rapid growth, should build a plant of about that same capacity.

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