THE HAND ENGINE DID IT.

THE HAND ENGINE DID IT.

A little blaze in Delhi, N. Y., seems to have set that quiet village in an uproar for the following reasons, as stated in a local paper of that place. The fire broke out in the Kipp Hotel. The hose companies responded, but the water pressure was so weak as to render their services almost useless. “The fire was fought bravely, says the paper, at close quarters by the hose boys, whose streams reached hardly more than six feet from the nozzles of their pipes. The engine company, whose members lived mostly at some distance, had been but partly aroused by the insufficient alarm, but they arrived on the scene, and after being sent to the river at the upper bridge, and Anally ordered back to the hydrant at the Episcopal church, secured suction for the hose, and being reinforced by addi tlonal volunteers, in about fifteen minutes a forcible stream subdued the flames. This was a great feat of the engine men. Only imagine the loss of property and probably life, which would have occurred had not this accommodating Arts waited for the members of the hand engine company to awake, assemble, drag the apparatus to the scene of the conflagration, run to the river for the water, run back again without attaining their object, hitch on to a hydrant giving about ten pounds pressure, and in spite of all these reverses to extinguish the flames in fifteen minutes.

We congratulate Delhi, which, probably, like its namesake in the far East, was saved by the pluck and bravery of her men when destruction seemed almost inevitable. What a reflection upon the shortcomings of fire-department methods is furnished by this little incident. A small steamer or chemical engine would have saved all the trouble if brought to the scene of tlie fire in good time. Delhi ought to purchase a steamer, a chemical engine and a water-barrel, and she could then defy the elements and be independent of defective hydrant service.

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