The Kanawha Chemical Engine.

The Kanawha Chemical Engine.

A short time ago a serious fire was threatened at Little Falls, N. J. The nearest city from which help could be obtained was Paterson, and a call for assistance was sent to that city. John Gilmore, assistant chief, with apparatus and men, was immediately dispatched to the place and he furnishes the following account of the occurrence: “The fire was in a 3-story tenement building and seemed so threatening that the Paterson department was telephoned for help. When 1 got near the place 1 thought surely I was going to have my hands full for a while as the whole third floor seemed to be ablaze. However, I found that the Lincoln fire company, of Totowa borough, were on the ground, as the Little Falls people had called upon them for assisiance and they soon had the fire under control, using their Kanawha air-pressure chemical fire engine. 1 ran a line of hose from the river and was all ready to use a stream of water, but the fire was put out entirely by the Lincoln fire company with their Kanawha chemical engine. I did not even open the nozzle of my hose. In all my experience as an active firefighter I never saw a chemical engine do such effective work as the Kanawha did at this fire, which seemed to be too much for any chemical engine. I am very glad io write you the above facts, as I cannot say too much in praise of the Kanawha chemical engine and the manner in which it was handled by the Lincoln fire company at this fire.”

The Kanawha Chemical Engine.

The Kanawha Chemical Engine.

The Kanawha Chemical Engine Manufacturing company, of Kanawha, W. Va., constructs chemical engines that utilise compressed air as a power to force fire-extinguishing chemical solutions from a cylinder with a capacity of 1,000 gal. or upwards by having a separate cylinder containing compressed air, with suitable connections between the chemical and air-cylinders, arranged with reducing valves of automatic action for governing the pressure and adapted to all kinds of movable and stationary fire appliances. This device is most simple in operation and perfectly safe-—there being no room for an accident, whether in or out of action. It also maintains, when in action any given pressure that the reducing valves are set at. No agitators or anything of the kind are required as is the case with the soda and acid apparatus. A powerful but compact airpump of the company’s own invention goes with each apparatus, which with the greatest ease, and rapidity compresses air in the air-cylinder to 1,000 lb. pressure to the square inch. With each apparatus, also, go extra air-cylinders, so that, in case it is necessary to repeat at a fire they arc ready for immediate action without loss of time. By this invention as was demonstrated at Boston, where a 4-wheel, 100-gal. fire department engine was used, a stream of chemicals over 150 ft. was elevated through 300 ft. of hose and did the same executions as on the level. It will thus be seen that such a stream can be elevated to the roof of the highest building, either by movable or stationary apparatus, and do full execution at that height. The company turns out heavy or light engines. The former is designed exclusively for fire departments and can be drawn by one or two horses or by hand. Its capacity is too gal. of fire-extinguishing solution. It is equiped with three air-cylinders each carrying air compound to 1,000 lb. to the square inch—sufficient to force the too gal. of chemical solution out of the large tank and hose at a steady pressure of too lb. maintained till all the contents of the tank are exhausted. Under the driver’s seat can l>c safely stored six full charges in 2-gal. glass receptacles, of highly concentrated chemicals, one of which, on being emptied into the chemical tank filled with water makes too gal. of a very effective fire-extinguishing fluid. The light-engines are equally effective for smaller towns, mills, villa-residences, seashore hotels, lumberyards, railway depots, etc., and do full execution at from 75 totoo ft. from the pipe-nozzle any given pressure being obtainable. Stationary apparatus on the same principle is also supplied for all kinds of buildings, steamboats, vessels of every class, factories and the like.

A defective flue is given as the origin of a $28,000 fire, which destroyed the hotel and sanitarium building at East Seattle, Wash. Cottagers and guests formed a fire brigade which prevented the flames spreading to adjoining buildings.