The Kansas City Case.

The Kansas City Case.

The water-works company of Kansas City will probably get a check from the city early next week for hydrant rentals. The Mayor will call a meeting of the council for Monday or Tuesday night, when an ordinance appropriating money to carry out the order issued by Judge Caldwell will be introduced. It is the belief of Mayor Cowherd that the ordinance will be passed, and that no time will be wasted in getting the check into the hands of the water-works company.

There has been considerable talk of using the $90,000 interest money on unsold water-works bonds in meeting this hydrant bill, and the legal phase of the question is now receiving attention. In reference to this matter City Counselor Rozzelle said :

“ As to the $90,000 interest money, I don’t know whether it will be possible to use that or not. I received a letter from the Mayor this afternoon asking for an opinion, but I have not looked the matter up enough yet to form any opinion. I shall do so to-morrow, however, but as I said, we don’t want any differences with the United States Court, and I think we shall submit the whole matter to Judge Caldwell and let him finally decide as to whether that fund is available for the purpose or not. Of the original hydrant rental fund of $73,000 there is now about $42,000 available. Some $14,000 of this fund was used for buying fire engines and more for equipping the fire department, a measure made necessary by the lack of water pressure. Then some of the fund was passed over to the garbage fund, but that has been practically replaced.”

Tuesday morning a formal order of Judge Caldwell was entered in the United States Court, allowing the litigants in the case twenty days to plead, practically making it forty days’ time for both parties to complete and file their supplemental evidence for the final hearing of the case on January 22.

The Kansas City Case.

The Kansas City Case.

Louis C. Krauthoff and L. C. Slavens, who came East several days ago to represent respectively the National Waterworks Company and the city of Kansas City in the taking of depositions to be used as evidence in the water-works litigation, returned last week. Testimony was taken in Chicago. Albany, Springfield, Mass., Newark, N. J., Paterson, N. J., Long Branch, Jamestown, N. Y., Brooklyn and New York city. The fire chiefs of the cities visited were examined and a large amount of expert testimony was taken. Mr. Krauthoff, who represents the National Water-works Company, said to a reporter :

“ The fire chiefs whose testimony we took had all been in Kansas City and inspected its water-works. Some of them attended the national convention of fire chiefs in Kansas City about two years ago and others had inspected the system as they chanced to be in Kansas City. Summed up, their testimony was highly favorable to the company. They pronounced out^system to be unusually good from the exhibitions they had seen of its workings and from the assurances they had had from Chief Hale. We took the testimony of the chief inspector of water supply and fire protection of the National Board of Underwriters, an expert of torty-five years’ experience, and he declared that Kansas City had the best system of water supply and fire protection in the country and that it is so rated by the board of underwriter*. He had visited the city, and in the company of Chief Hale inspected the waterworks system. Chief Hale referred him, he said, to his reports, which he now says were written by Major Jones. In his report, the witness said, he declared the water-works system of Kansas City to be splendid and amply adequate. Peter Milne of Brooklyn and a famous hydraulic engineer, who was in Kansas City about two weeks ago, said that he considered our system very near perfect, and that there were fewer breaks here than in any other city in the United States.

“ R. II. Weems, a director of the National Water-works Company, testified that the stock in the company is held by conservative investors, and that speculation figured insignificantly in its purchase. The stock, he said, was purchased at par on the strength of assurances of the city officials of Kansas City. Mr. Weems said that four and one-half millions in cash was put into the plant, and that cash dividends aggregating only fifteen per cent had been paid on the investment, the remainder of the net earnings having been reinvested in improvements. He said that the company wished to build a tunnel under the Missouri river, and had offered engineers one-half million dollars to build one. None could be found, however, who would undertake the work, the project not being regarded as feasible. Finally, he said, the company was forced to go to Quindaro. The company, Mr. Weems said, has always been and is now ready to convey to the city a complete and independent plant.”