The Kennedy Valve Manufacturing Company’s Plant.

The Kennedy Valve Manufacturing Company’s Plant.

An illustrated paper, read before the Brooklyn Engineers’ club by Thomas C. Flinn, describes the Kennedy Valve Manufacturing company’s factory as a modern plant. He says that several years ago the company decided to double the capacity of its plant, then located at Coxsackie, N. Y. At that time no consideration was given to moving; but it was determined to make a new rearrangement of the plant. At the same time, simply for comparison, a model arrangement was made irrespective of any restrictions to present conditions and location. A miniature plan of the proposed new works was made, showing the arrangement of the different machines, and it was found that, to carry out the design, another location would be necessary. The new plant was decided upon, after much time was spent in inspecting other cities thought eligible for manufacturing purposes. Elmira was selected, on account of its shipping facilities and other favorable conditions. The site of the plant occupies 22 acres. The pattern building, which is 50 by 300 ft., is divided into three equal parts by fire-walls and built round by 12-in. thick concrete walls with fire-doors. The iron foundry is constructed in the same way, with an extra monitor extending the who’ length of the building. These buildings were designed to ‘carry a 20-ton crane with a 20-ton load running longitudinally at a rate of 300 ft. per minute. The building, including the large machine shops, is composed of steel superstructure with heavy concrete and brick walls and concrete piers at the end of the structure. The general plan of the plant consists of live buildings. The first one constructed was the pattern storage-building, 50×300. followed by the iron foundry, 96×300; iron machine shop, 96×400; the brass department building, 50×600: the powerhouse, 50×75, and the office building, two stories, 40×80. While installing the railroad siding, sewer and water piping, bids for the construction of the building as a whole were received; also, in detail, according to the classification, such as foundations, steelwork, brickwork, carpentry, roofing and painting. All plans were submitted to the insurance people for approval, and then to other experts in their respective lines to pass on, and contracts were awarded to those contractors whom the experts passed as most suitable in their particular line. The comoany has also erected too workmen’s dwellings, and in point of detail the whole plant may certainly be considered a modern institution. An illustration of the buildings is given herewith.

KENNEDY VALVE MEG. COMPANY’S PLANT.

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