THE METERAGE EXPERIENCE OF ONE CITY.

THE METERAGE EXPERIENCE OF ONE CITY.

In a recent report of the Water Department of Newark, N. J., there were some very pertinent remarks on the advantage of the meterage system. Citizens, the report said, are vitally interested in a continued water supply as an important factor in their daily life and nothing possible to insure pure water in sufficient quantities should be left undone. Every gallon of water furnished costs a definite sum—some one has to pay for it. Selling water by assessed rates, without meters, is a guess, and a very bad guess, at that. For economic reasons, users of water through meters, turn it off, when not in use. It is, therefore, unfair to use meters on the great majority of users and at the same time allow certain customers to maintain an unrestricted service, and allow water extravagantly to run into the sewers. The report goes on to say: “The Bureau of Water undertook to meter the city, and nearly 12,000 meters were installea. The loss of water was greatly lessened, and our records show a smaller total consumption of water, but greatly increased revenues.”

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