THE MOGUL DRAUGHT SPRINGS.

THE MOGUL DRAUGHT SPRINGS.

The Mogul draught springs, manufactured by the Ball-Bearing Snap Hook company, of 66 Broadway, Manhattan, New York, can be attached to each trace springs are made to suit any and every kind of cart, wagon, truck, and agricultural implement that is drawn by horses; and of different strengths adapted to loads of different weights. They have been generally adopted by coal and iron companies; the United States government uses them for its artillery service, and too fire departments have bought them.

SKAGRAVE COMBINATION HUSE WAGON

so as to help a horse to start his load gradually. They are made of two spiral springs wound in opposite directions and coiled one within the other around two sliding links. The links prevent the Over-straining or the pulling out of the springs; for when the springs are distended as far as they should be, the links take hold and bear the strain. ‘ .

A FEW REMARKS AS TO OTHER MANUFACTURRES.

Extended notices have not been given to all our advertisers of firefighting supplies—the limits of our space would not admit of that being done. A study of our advertising pages will show the names of othefS Whose goods are equally worthy of notice and purchase. In the line of hose are the Cornelius Callahan company, the fabric Fire Hose company, the Eureka Fire Hose company, and the Boston Woven Hose and Rubber company, the Chicago Fire Hose company, and “Barnes of Boston.” These remind the reader of the National Electric Hose Signal company, of Boston. The Montauk Fire Detecting Wire company is well known in its valuable line, as is the Stewart & Pownall’s electric light emergency switch for fire stations and burglar alarms. For fire extinguishing by chemicals come Charles T. Holloway, of Baltimore, and the vantacaw .Manufacturing company, of Philadelphia; for ordinary fire extinguishing by water it is only necessary to refer to the American Fire Engine, the La France, the Manchester, N. H., Locomotive works, the Racine Fire Engine and Motor company, of South Milwaukee, Wis., and the Gleason & Bailey and Rumsey branch of the International Fire Engine company. For fire supplies, equipment in the way of hose wagons, etc., in general, outside of those mentioned can be mentioned all of those already set down, the Fire Extinguisher Manufacturing company, of Chicago; A. F. and S. C. Stewart, of Rochester, N. Y.; and the Seagrave company, of Columbus, Ohio. Two illustrations of the last named company’s productions are given herewith, one showing a combination hook and ladder truck, the other a combination chemical engine and hose Wagon, each, of course, up-to-date in every way. For pompier work are the outfits of Mrs. Chris Hoell, of St. Louis, Mo., a name well known in the history of the old days of the New York fire department. For the personal comfort of the firemen are the Vagen-Bader company’s head protectors, the John Olson and the E. P. Gleason Manufacturing companies’ aluminum and other fire hats; Cairns & Bro.’s New York house for all sorts of personal equipments; the Burton-Pierce company, of Boston; R. W. Stockley & Co.; George Evans & Co.; and Henderson & Co.; all of Philadelphia, for uniforms; the C. G. Braxmar company, for medals and badges; the John Robbins Manufacturing company, for badges.

SEAGRAVE COMBINATION HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK.AJAX ELECTRIC RUNABOUT FOR FIRE CHIEFS.

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