THE NEPTUNE METER COMPANY.

THE NEPTUNE METER COMPANY.

This company gave a parting banquet at the Briggs house recently in honor of its Chicago representative, Harry F. Brown, who is to take charge of the Eastern end of the company’s business at headquarters, 120 Liberty street, Manhattan, New York. Calvin S. Brown will succeed Harry as Western manager, with his office at 54 Canal street, Chicago. At the banquet the Western salesmen of the company, C. S. Brown, E. B. Holley. Hugh Doran, C. M. Wetherell, Rock Island, Ill., Fred Hanks, Cleveland, Ohio, and L. R. Mills, Coffeyville, Kan., were present, besides other invited friends. The affair was a regular love feast, and the sentiments expressed by those present showed the high appreciation in which they hold Mr. Brown.

Clinton, Ill., has a newly organised fire department, of which Fred Anger is secretary. It consists of two companies.

THE NEPTUNE METER COMPANY.

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THE NEPTUNE METER COMPANY.

The Neptune Meter company has established headquarters at 120 Liberty street, Manhattan, New York, as announced in a previous issue of this journal. Its offices at Newark and the Park Row building, Manhattan, have been discontinued, and all business will in future be conducted at the above address. The factory of the company will still be at Long Island City, borough of Queens, New York, where, with the extensions and improvements lately made to the building and the addition of new machinery, it is expected the plant will be able to meet all the demands made upon it for some time to come. The announcement made by the company that it has sold 120,000 meters during the past thirty-six months looks like a very satisfactory condition of affairs.

The body of Fireman John J. Fellow, who was killed in the recent fire which destroyed the Boutelle building, at Minneapolis, Minn., received a fireman’s funeral. Over 100 of his comrades in uniform followed the remains to St. Mark’s church, where the boy choir sang appropriate hymns and chanted the funeral psalm. As the body was borne from the church, Beethoven’s funeral march was played on the organ. Rich floral offerings from the firemen and citizens in every walk of life were heaped upon the coffin. The pallbearers were eight firemen, who, with the others, accompanied the body to the grave in Lakewood cemetery. The rector of St. Mark’s said in his address that, if Fellows had not been unselfish and sacrificed himself, he might have saved his own life. “He died as honor dies, and was laid to rest in the midst of sympathy, not only of a city which he had served, but of bis own greaf State.”