THE NEW ENGINE AT NORWICH.

THE NEW ENGINE AT NORWICH.

A public test of the new third-size Metropolitan steam fire engine, recently purchased by the fire department, was given last week at Norwich, Conn. The trial lasted an hour and a quarter, and six different tests were made of from five to ten minutes each, in which the engine did remarkably good work. Owing to the low tide, it was necessary to draught water twenty feet. Steam was made from cold water. George C. Sweet and William Woodman, both expert engineers, who have handled fire engines all their lives, were appointed by Chief Stanton to keep the record of the tests. The steaming tests resulted as follows;

The engine was opened in eight minutes and five seconds, with fifty pounds of steam, and at the end of eleven minutes it had reached one hundred pounds, and the safety-valve set at 140 pounds opened at twelve minutes. The engine was then put through the following tests; Test No. 1.—With 150 feet of hose and an inch and a quarter nozzle, there was 125 pounds steam pressure, 230 pounds water pressure and 300 revolutions a minute. Test No. 2.—With two lines of hose 150 feet each, with one and one-eighth-inch nozzles, 140 pounds of steam. 140 pounds water pressure. 468 revolutions a minute. Test No. 3 —With two lines of hose 150 feet each, each siamesed into an Eastman Deluge set taking out one stream with an inch and a half nozzle, 140 pounds of steam, 135 pounds water pressure and 328 revolutions. Test No. 4.—Same as No. 3, except an inch and threequarters nozzle, 140 pounds of steam, 100 pounds water pressure, 348 revolutions. Test No. 5— Four lines of hose 150 feet each, from Y’s connected at the engine into four-way Eastman Deluge set at the end of the line, taking out one stream, with /an inch and three-quarters nozzle, 135 pounds of steam, no pounds water pressure. 370 revolutions. Test No. 6.—Four lines of hose 150 feet each, throwing four-inch streams through an inch and one-eighth nozzles. No record was made of this test, as it is beyond the power of a third-size engine. It did the work well, however, and threw good streams. Tests Nos. 3 and 5 showed the finest streams of solid water ever seen in the city, and thrown at a height beyond anything it will ever be called upon to do. The nozzle tips, one and one-half and one and three-quarter inches, give some idea of the amount of water thrown. The size used at ordinary fires is one and one-eighth-inch. The tests were in charge of Engineer Charles E. Wessell, and with him was Engineer Calvin C. Williams, who will have charge of the steamer. Following the test, the board of fire commissioners accepted ;t, and it is now in commission in th*e central fire station. Among those present from out of town to witness the test were Joseph B. Cunningham, of New Haven, president of the hoard of fire commissioners, and William C. Foote, a substitute engineer in the department; William B. Perkins, an assistant engineer in the department, besides engineers from New London and other cities.

In one of its answers to correspondents, the Fireman, of London. England, claims the water tower as a British invention. “It was first applied many years ago to a fire escape in the form of copper tubing carried up on the underside of the ladders. Subsequently a similar device made its appearance in the United States. The ‘Pett Elbow’ (adds the Fireman), which is attached to an ordinary hose pipe, is a much more serviceable anoliance tinder the conditions existing in Great Britain, where ‘skyscrapers’ are almost unknown. If huge towers such as the Americans use were necessary on this side of the Atlantic, you may be quite sure the British firms would build water towers on wheels such as are used in the States.”

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