The New England Association Convention

The New England Association Convention

The coming convention of the New England Water Works Association—the thirty-ninth—promises to be one of the most successful and important in every way that the association has ever held. The New England Water Works Association has had a rather unique history. Started in 1881, as a local organization designed to bring together the scattered water works men of the New England States and give them the benefit of their fellows’ experience and the advantages that conference and discussion bring with them, it has grown and expanded into a national organization whose influence is extended into all parts of this land and Canada and whose decisions in matters of water supply must he reckoned with. This is especially true from the fact that its acts are invariably tinged with the natural conservatism that is an inherent part of the New England character, and this has made its actions in matters connected with water works perhaps as authoritative as any other organization of men in this line. This is quite natural as. while its membership is nation-wide and embraces men from practically every state in the Union, the great majority are from the eastern section of the country and for this reason the association in its acts partakes of the forethought and careful weighing of a subject before taking action that is a strong characteristic of the New England mind. This no doubt has been one of the greatest elements in the growth of this association and one that works toward both its success and its prestige among engineering societies. Another strong feature in its growth has been the practically uniform harmony that has characterized its meetings. The absence of bickering, the lack of cliques that tend to disrupt a society quicker than anything else and which work to weaken its organization and prestige has been a remarkable fact in the history of the New England Water Works Association. The subjecting of personal ambitions to the good of the organization among its members has done more to elevate it to its present position of authority and importance than any other thing in its existence. Taken all in all, the New England Water Works Association can well he proud of its organization and its growth and feel that its coming convention will be a banner one in the history of the society.

The New England Association Convention

The New England Association Convention

The annual convention of the New England Water Works Association, which takes place on September 30, October 1, 2 and 3, and in honor of which this number of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING is a special edition, marks the thirty-eighth year of that organization, it having been organized in 1882. From the small and humble beginning the association has grown to be a power to be reckoned with in the water works field, with a membership of 882.

While primarily, as its name implies, an association of eastern water works men, the organization has so far extended its influence and prestige that its membership includes water works men from nearly every State and from many foreign countries. That a society of this kind can exercise a great influence, goes without saying. Its members include many men prominent in the water works of this country, and the deliberations and discussions at its meetings are given a wide circulation in this field. So that the annual convention of the association, with its attendant papers, discussions, exhibits and so on, marks an event of great importance in the province of water supply. The convention this year meeting, as it does, in the capital city of the Empire State, with its central location and many attractions, should have a very large attendance of water works men, both of members of the organization and visitors interested in the subject of water supply. A very instructive and interesting program has been arranged, as will he seen by reference to our news columns, and lively discussions on the various topics can he looked forward to. Every eastern water works man should attend this convention.