The New England Convention

The New England Convention

The next big event in the water works field—and not so far off, as dates go—is the New England Water Works Association convention. This year the body has taken a radical departure from usual practices and is to hold its convention on board of a steamer. This, however, has by no means detracted from the usual practical character of this association’s annual gatherings, as will be seen by glancing at the program published in this issue. The papers are fully up to the usual standard, and there is the added advantage that the members, when these papers are read, will be on the “briny deep,” and sufficiently far away from land to preclude their offering the excuse of interesting side trips to “cut” a paper or two.

The experiment of the association in thus departing from set custom—coming as it does from New England —is an interesting one. Its success is in the hands of the members and it rests with them to bring it through with flying colors or to allow it to fail. If past performances count for anything the former will be the result.

The New England Convention

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The New England Convention

With a splendid history of achievement behind it and with every prospect of prosperity and healthy growth before it, the New England Water Works Association enters upon its forty-third year and will hold its forty-third annual convention next week at Rochester, N. Y. The program as published in this week’s issue on page 691 demonstrates that the association is wide awake to the necessity of presenting practical papers for discussion and also for allowing plenty of latitude to the members for analyzing these papers from the floor of the convention after they have been read.

In fact, this one feature of the New England Association’s conventions is most striking—the amount and general participation in discussions by its members. Possibly one reason for this is the fact of the association’s frequent meetings, in which the members get to know each other so well that the convention becomes a sort of family gathering. There is therefore little of the awe of one another that may be present in a larger gathering when the members are comparative strangers.

With the genial host of the convention—“Beek” Little, of Rochester—in charge of local arrangements and with the committee of the Manufacturers’ Association back of the entertainment there is no doubt that this feature of the convention will be all that is expected of it. The exhibits, too, promise to be numerous and of the best of quality. So that the forty-third annual convention should be in every wav equal to any other previously held and a great success.