THE NEW ENGLAND WATERWORKS CONVENTION

THE NEW ENGLAND WATERWORKS CONVENTION

The committees are getting matters into shape for the meeting of the New England Waterworks association at Atlantic City, N. J., next month. There will be an attractive program and complete arrangements for the entertainment of those who intend to be present. Remember the date, September 23d, 24th and 25th. Williard Kent, secretary, Tremont Temple, Boston, will furnish full particulars.

THE NEW ENGLAND WATERWORKS CONVENTION.

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THE NEW ENGLAND WATERWORKS CONVENTION.

For twenty-one years the New England Waterworks association has pursued a quiet, but successful career in the way of educating waterworks men in the practical and scientific work of their profession, and although its efforts have chiefly been directed to the instruction of the superintendents, engineers and water officials of New England, its work has been productive of great benefit to those who pursue the same calling outside of the limits of New England, owing to its proceedings being all duly recorded in the journal which the association publishes. The twenty-first convention, in honor of which this special edition of FIRE AND WATER is issued, promises to be full of interest, and a glance at the program published elsewhere will show the practical nature of the papers to be read, the reports to be listened to, and the topics to be discussed, while the fact that the meeting is to be held in Boston guarantees not only a full attendance both of members and outsiders, but also a large and interesting collection of exhibits, which convey objectively much of the teaching afforded subjectively by the papers and discussions. Sttch gatherings cannot but inure to the benefit of the cause they are intended to serve, and to stimulate those communities which have not as yet installed a waterworks system to take immediate steps towards furnishing its members with one of the greatest means of promoting sanitary reform and securing effective fire protection, and to stir up those who have such a system installed to inquire whether or not it is of the most modern style, up to the demands of the day, and so equipped as to combine the maximum of efficiency with the minimum of cost —one of the great objects for which such associations have been organised and one which the New England Waterworks association has done much to bring about.