The New Fire Alarm Telegraph Chief

The New Fire Alarm Telegraph Chief

Leonard Day, who was recently appointed by Fire Commissioner Joseph Johnson to the position of chief of the New York Fire Alarm Telegraph Bureau, has already begun to devise radical changes in the system. He has started in to do just what Commissioner Johnson wanted— better the service and place it on a higher standing than before. He hopes to have the new system completed inside of two years. Having known l’ire Commissioner Johnson for several years Mr. Day visited his office on May 8 and for the first time knew that he was the new chief of the bureau. “T don’t like to make a complaint about you on your first day of duty for being late,” remarked Commissioner Johnson as Mr. Day entered his office on May 8, “but since noon you have been chief of the Fire Alarm Telegraph bureau of the F’ire Department.” Mr. Day looked at the fire commissioner as if he had misunderstood his remark, and for the first time Commissioner Johnson explained that he had been selected to fill the position formerly occupied by Mr. Kennard. Mr. Day at once asked to be directed to his new office and began work at once. Born in Fitchburg, Mass., on August 8, 1880, Mr. Day was graduated from the local high school and entered Worcester Polytechnic Institute, from which he was graduated in 1902. In the same year he was appointed an examiner for the United States Patent Office, two years later becoming chief of the Patent Office at the St. Louis Imposition. Ihe following year he received the degrees of EL. B. and P. 1.. from the George Washington University of Washington, D. C. In the same year lie was admitted to the bar of the District of Columbia and later became a member of a firm of patent attorneys in New York City. While practising in New York he took a post-graduate course at Worcester and w»s later admitted to the bar in New York state. After receiving his degree of E. E. in 1907 Mr. Day was married in Atlanta, Ga., coming to Manhattan, where he opened an office in Rector street as an electrical engineer. In 1910 he became president of the Wolf Chemical Company and the following year was admitted to the bar of the United States Supreme Court. After his appointment as chief of the telegraph bureau Mr. Day sold the Wolf Chemical Company.

MARION APARTMENT, KNOXVILLE, TENN., AFTER FIRE DESCRIBED IN A RECENT ISSUE OF FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING.
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