THE NEW YORK FIREBUGS.

THE NEW YORK FIREBUGS.

A new candidate for admission into the ranks of the New York firebugs has appeared in the shape of Martba Taylor, a negro laundress, of No, 249 West Sixtieth street. As stated last week in FIRE AND WATER a rear flat of three rooms on the second floor of No. 222 West Sixty-fourth street was discovered to be on fire, piles of rubbish and excelsior, kerosene-soaked, being a-light. The fire was soon extinguished and Deputy Fire Marshal Sullivan on inquiry found that thisnegress, who had been evicted in the morning for non-payment of rent, had been seen in the house that evening a few minutes before the fire was discovered. She borrowed pome matches front a tenant, and the next that was seen of her was her form scuttling out of the house. The fire came immediately after. She was arrested and, on being asked what she had to say, replied: “ Kcally, Judge, yo’ Honah, I doan’ honestly think I done set that flah.” She was held for the grand jury.

Louis Gordon, on trial for firing his shirt factory on Walker street, was committed to the Tombs although the testimony for the prosecution was not all in. He had previously been out on $10,000 bail. Seme thought he was sent to prison because he was frequently noticed going into various rooms of the court corridors that are not open to the public in general, much less to prisoners on trial, even though out on bail. It was also temarked that he mingled with the jurymen on several occasions when they were passing into the court from the corridors. The most probable reason for his commitment, however, was the damning nature of the evidence for the prosecution given by Mat Glueckman, the “ mechanic.” Anyhow be was a very much surprised man when he was taken to the Tombs on the order of Judge Fitzgerald. At his trial the evidence of Glueckman the informer was completed. .He testified that Adolph Ilirsehkopf made a business of supplying combustibles and explosives for incendiary fires. Ilirsehkopf had brought Glueckmun hack from Europe that he might send him to St. Louis to set fires there. Glueckman, however, was arrested when he landed in New York. He had received the same fee, $250, for setting the fire in the Cohen place on White street as he received for that in Walker street. Subsequently, he said Ilirsehkopf hired a house in South Eighth street, Brooklyn, installed the witness and another man in it, and then set it on fire. Ilirsehkopf insured Glueckman’s furniture there for $600. Glueckman received only $200 for “standing in.” This he looked upon as swindling and was consequently very indignant thereat. Ilirsehkopf led him Into the incendiary business. He did not know that he had been implicated in crimes which might send him to the electric chair. He did not know exactly how many fires Ilirsehkopf had setin NewYork; probably four or five. When the counsel had finished with Glueckman some of the jurymen took him in hand and cross-examined him on their own account. The questions they put to him showed they had not the highest possible idea of his character. Felix F. Pollock, a merchant, and George Silery, night watchman, told of the explosion in Gordon’s factory and the progress of the flames. Chief Lally also testified to a separate explosion. Their evidence, being that of men of repu’able character, was listened to with interest by the jury. Foreman Frcel of the fire department gave evidence to the same effect. In cross-examinanation he was considerably worried by the counsel for the defence who endeavored to show that the fireman was mistaken in his assumption that the fire which he helped to quench was of incendiary origin. In particular he tried to shake his testimony on the point that the unusual smell which was noticed by the firemen on the premises was due to the highly combustible nature of the chemicals used by the alleged incendiaries. All he could succeed in showing was that Foreman Freel’s nose might not be an infallible guide.

THE NEW YORK FIREBUGS.

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THE NEW YORK FIREBUGS.

Mrs. Johnson, accused of having set the two fires in the Winona flats, Central Part West, and held in bail for the grand jury, has been indicted by that body and will be tried for arson as soon possible.

The trial of Louis Gordon for setting fire to his shirt store at No. 21 Walker street still “drags its slow length along,” Samuel Milch, the professional firebug and informer, the star witness in the case, being the central figure. He declined being looked upon in any other light than that of a mere incendiary,and denied that he had ever been concerned in any case of arson where life had been lost.The fact was brought out that Milch was under indictment for arson in the second degree and in the third degree, and that he was under bail in only one case. Milch was then asked in relation to the meeting of the alleged conspirators on the Harlem bridge, aud whether there had been any second meeting or appointment, and on his answering in the negative his testimony of the first day was read to him, showing that he had said a second interview bad been arranged. In answer to questions in regard to Hyman Cohn, Milch said that Cohn’s place was formerly at No. 640 Broadway,one of the buildings which were burned on the night of Election day. Milch also tes tified that Cohn was to get nothing for his part in the conspiracy, unless he managed the whole business for Mr. Gordon. In cross-examination Milch said he had scraps of paper signed by Gordon relating to the fire, other than the 1 per cent, contract, and the inventories. His interview with Assistant District Attorny Davistook place after he got out on bail, aud after that he had a midnight interview with Gordon at tbe latter’s house, No. 252 Madison avenue. Milch added that he had at first twelve men employed for ten days in making the inventory of Gordon’s factory after the fire, and had another party for fourteen days doing the same thing. The proof of loss was made from the inventory.

All efforts to break down Milch’s testimony were in vain and on the re-direct examination he said he had paid for some of the wine drunk in tbe wine room near tbe Harlem bridge and Hyman Cohen for more. lie denied that there were three indictments against him and added that he had known the three Rosenthalls, the fire adjusters, several years. They were at the Gordon fire and had helped to adjust tbe loss. The agreement made with Glueckman as to the division of the fire insurance money on Gordon’s factory was afterwards reduced to writing. The agreement was offered in evidence, but,as it bore only Milchs’ signature, it was ruled out as incompetent. As to the value of Gordon’s stock, the witness said they could only get 80 per cent, of the insurance. They wanted $52, -000 and had therefore to value the stock at $65,000; but, thinking that that figure would look suspicious, they made it $64,918. This ended Milch’s six days’ examination.