The Niles, Ohio, Water Supply

The Niles, Ohio, Water Supply

Alexander Potter, consulting engineer of New York City, recently presented a brief summary of the findings of his investigation conducted for the city of Warren, Ohio, of a possible water supply for the cities of the Mahoning Valley at a noon luncheon of the chamber of commerce in Niles. Under the provisions of a law recently enacted by the Ohio legislature it is possible for one or more counties to combine in a sanitary district. This can be done either by petition signed by 500 residents from each county to be included or by legislative enacted by the city council. Mr. Potter advocated that such a district be formed including the cities of Niles, Warren and Youngstown. He predicted that from a commercial standpoint the three cities would eventually become practically one and consequently plans for a water supply should be made with this idea in view.

The inestimable value of the Milton dam to Warren and Niles as well as Youngstown was pointed out by Mr. Potter, who holds the opinion that the solution of the water supply problem lies in damming up the flood torrents of the spring and conserving them for use during later seasons. As a reservoir for this flood tide, he believes nature has provided a perfect basin in the Mosquito Creek, which could accommodate millions of gallons of water to be gradually returned to the river channels during the dry-season. The river water would be diverted around in a northerly direction to the creek basin, where it would be confined by concrete gates. By such a provision, it would be possible to regulate a water flow in the Mahoning to about 350,000,000 gallons daily since the Milton dam was costructed and something like three or four million gallons daily without the reserve which the dam has provided. The expense of the survey thus far has been borne by Warren, though other cities will profit by the findings. Newton Palls, Warren, Girard and Youngstown have already signified their support and co-operation by action through ther respective city councils, while Niles is the only city which has not done so. They will be asked to enact legislation in the near future to this end. Expense of the improvement would be borne by all cities benefited in ratio to their population, making the heaviest expense fall upon Youngstown. The increased valuation of property as the result of the improvement would counterbalance the expenditure, Mr. Potter asserted. The plan which he suggests has never been formally adopted, but it is regarded as the most plausible solution and will be recommended to the board of the proposed sanitary sewer district, with the probable result that it will be adopted. Mr. Potter recalled very pleasantly the beginning of his successful professional career, which was in Niles, when he laid out the original sewer system of the city, something like 29 years ago. He complimented the city upon its growth and progress and predicted a wonderful future for this district, which he stated is the second largest mill and manufacturing district of the country.

The fire department of P’loral Park, L. I., N. Y., with the delivery of a new ladder truck is now completely motorized. The membership of the department now number 90 men, distributed among three companies. The amount of hose carried is 1500 feet. The money for the three new apparatus, which have recently been added, was voted at a special election of the taxpayers last August.

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