THE “PREMIER” WATER METER.

THE “PREMIER” WATER METER.

Arthur S. Tuttle, principal assistant engineer of the board of estimate and apportionment, New York city, has given to the world a new water meter which he styles the “Premier.” It is to form part of the exhibit of the National Meter company at the St. Louis Fair. The meter is of the proportional displacement type, and consists of three parts.: (1) A Venturi tube consisting of a short contracting section of the main, joined to an expanding section by a short cylindrical section built into and forming part of the main. The smaller ends of the upstream and the downstream cones are of the same diameter as the connecting cylinder, while the larger diameters correspond with that of the pipe line. (2) A bypass of much smaller diameter than the main and its similar cone and throat, and with each part bearing a definite and known relation to the corresponding parts of the main, leads from the main just above the upstream end of the upstream cone, meeting it again at the throat at an acute angle and through a contracting cone and throat. (3) A recorder—a displacement meter specially designed, which is inserted on the pipe of the by-pass, and so contrived as to register the entire flow through both tubes, equivalent to that of the main. The very appreciable drop in pressure takes place, in the Premier meter, at the common throat, and is felt in the large and small upstream cones, producing in each a flow, whose relative value is constant. The slight friction of the recording apparatus is overcome by special features of a less important sort. These reduce the velocity of the main in the by-pass, and thus remove to a great extent the danger of the entrance of floating material. The meter is simple in construction; it can be set up without expert supervision ; it can be read by an unskilled attendant; it needs no adjustment; is entirely self-operating, the record being continued indefinitely ; it may be wholly buried in the ground, and requires only a small chamber round the recording apparatus, the same as an ordinary house meter. The danger of freezing is also reduced to a minimum, owing to the constant motion of water through all its parts, and no greater friction loss is produced in the main by this metter, than by one of any other type.

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