THE QUALITIES OF MORAL MANHOOD REQUIRED TO MAKE THE IDEAL FIREMAN.

THE QUALITIES OF MORAL MANHOOD REQUIRED TO MAKE THE IDEAL FIREMAN.

A paper was recently read before the seventeenth annual convention of the Illinois Firemen’s Association at Waukegan, Ill., by Burton C. Dinius, secretary and captain of the Zion City, Ill., fire department. He pointed out that, while the reason of the existence of the Zion City fire department was identical with all fire departments—namely, to fight fire, it differed chiefly in the personnel of the officers and men, as the casual observer, who just dropped in and looked round the station for a few minutes would not notice many things different from the average fire station of its size and kind. The regular daily routine of the men was as follows: All started their work with a few minutes spent in singing a hymn, reading of Scripture and prayer. In general, the qualities which go to make up the ideal fireman are many. He should be what all mankind should be, but unfortunately is not yet. He should have a clear brain, steady hand, and pure heart. He should he practically all that a good soldier is, and, in some respects, more. He must grasp the situation, form a plan, and put it in execution in a moment’s time. He must have no place for fear, and never be afraid to face danger and even death. In the histories of nearly every nation we find the different epochs are usually marked by some war, in which are recorded the deeds of bravery of the soldiers. Each individual soldier is only an atom, as it were, when compared with the size of the whole body which is engaged. The individuals lorm the companies, the companies, the regiments, the regiments, the brigades, and so on to the whole command) the movements of which are directed by one man, and are like the operations of some gigantic piece of machinery. The soldier considers himself the equal or superior to the force which he is fighting, while the fireman has to fight a foe which is mightier than he— an element which is the most treacherous of all elements. He fights many times singlehanded, sometimes by twos and fours, nor does he hesitate to look death in the face, while alone attempting to rescue some imperiled fellow being whom the flames have trapped. It is the fireman’s duty to ascend long ladders and scale buildings, the thought of which would make the ordinary person shudder, even when everything is quiet and calm, but through smoke and fire he will force his way to reach some unfortunate person who is bewildered and confused by the smoke and heat, or to gain some point of vantage from which he can direct the streams of chemicals and water to subdue the foe which he is fighting. It was pleasant to notice that among the most prominent and noted men of the United States can be found men that are, or once were connected with fire departments. He pointed to George Washington, who was a most energetic fireman; and down to the present time can he found many men who were firemen, and who have risen to the highest positions. Across the water are men of international fame and high rank who are at the head of the service. All firemen should endeavor to live lives above reproach, so that, should any unfortunate circumstance cause a suspicion to fall upon them, their past lives may stand out in strong contrast with the circumstance on which any accusation may be founded. The everyday life and habits of a man are what are most considered when his character is assailed; hence, they should always live in the present, and carefully guard their every act, and not look forward to something in the hazy future, which may make one famous. They should at all times be ready to meet their God, and be prepared to meet any duty, no matter how small or great. To be so prepared, their every thought and act must he upright and honorable. It was not any one act that made man truly famous, hut his everyday life put together that made him good or bad, and the man who lives up to the full measure of his possibilities is true to his God, true to his country, and true to the cause he is serving. And these are all included in the qualities of moral manhood required to make the ideal fireman.

The Portian, Ore., says in a dispatch from Washington that, the attention of the reclamation engineers has been directed to the Pahsamari Valley, in Custer and Lemhi counties, Idaho, where, it is believed, probably 200.000 acres of fertile land could lie reclaimed by water now going to waste in that section.

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