The Rains and Floods.

The Rains and Floods.

Although the first estimates of the damage wrought by floods are often exaggerated, it can hardly be doubted that in some parts of the South the recent visitation was practically without a precedent. The worst effects seem to have been experienced in Georgia and South Carolina, where the streams suddenly rose to such a height as to ruin the cotton crop in their neighborhood and to interrupt railway traffic, while the bursting of a dam near Augusta inundated a part of that city to the depth of from 6 to 12 ft. Sixty persons were drowned in Augusta, and its plight was rendered doubly trymg because during the prevalence of the deluge she also suffered from two fires, one very destructive. Because of the flood, the fire department could not get to the spot where the fires were. It is feared that the total loss by the floods will be well on to $5,000,ooo.

The area in which extraordinary precipitation occurred extended northeastward to New York and New England. In New York city the rainfall for two days amounted to 3.36 inches—nearly the proper quota for a single month. Though the metropolis escaped in what, on the w’hole, must be regarded as a fortunate manner, the rupture of water mains and sewers on Tuesday and Wednesday, August 25 and 26, and the collapse of pavements in some parts of the city told how unusual was the storm.

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