THE RETIREMENT OF CHIEF LARKIN.

THE RETIREMENT OF CHIEF LARKIN.

With the retirement of Chief Daniel C. Larkin, of Dayton, Ohio, the fire service of the country sustains the loss of one of its most prominent, highly respected and popular members. There are few chief engineers on this continent who do not know the big, goodhearted and intelligent chief of Dayton, and it goes without saying that universal regret will be felt at his laying down his helmet while in the zenith of his greatness and popularity. He was always recognised as one of the best equiped men at the head of the fire departments of the country, and one who was always willing to discuss questions of better methods of fire-extinguishment with members of his craft, who were less fortunate than himself in experience and a thorough knowledge of discipline and administration. So it is that this fine character, this competent and greatly respected member of the fire-force of the United States has thought best to retire than serve where there was any friction to impair his usefulness to the people he represented. Daniel C. Larkin had a long and honored career as a firefighter in Dayton, having entered the department as its chief on July 5, 1880. At the time of his advent into the department there were but eleven horses, six hose reels, two small engines and one hook and ladder truck in the service. At that time there were only thirty-five fire-alarm boxes, and every available foot of hose only totaled 2,000 ft. There were but eighteen regular firemen and a few “minute” men. Such an equipment would be a sorry sight compared with the present high standard of the department, for which the retiring chief is largely responsible. During the administration of Chief Larkin the fire-losses of Dayton will compare favorably with those of any city of its size in the country. The chief has been an indefatigable worker among his men. and, although he enforced strict discipline at all times, results were obtained, and he was esteemed and respected by his subordinates. He has enjoyed the confidence and respect of the business men and citizens of the city, and at no time has his ability and integrity been questioned. The pity of it is that Chief Larkin is now an active man and qualified in everv respect to discharge the duties of chief of any fire department for a long time to come. After twentyseven years in that capacity, however, it must be said that no man need seek greater honor, and bis resignation was that of the man who would not yield to the opinion of those who were inexperienced in the conduct of matters entirely within the province of the chief. A faithful officer of the International Association of Fire Engineers for many years, where he has filled the position of treasurer ever since 1889, when former Chief Hendrick declined re-election, his fidelity in that position and his conscientiousness over the minutest details have been as conspicuous as they were during his tenure of the office of chief of the fire department of Dayton.

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