The Rialto Fire at Kansas City.

The Rialto Fire at Kansas City.

In regard to the fire in the Rialto Building, Kansas City, Mo., Chief Egner sends the following additional details. The building was a five-story one occupying about 100×110 feet in the office and retail business district. It was built of brick and wood, with a brick partition wall in the center with openings and without sprinklers or other protection. The fire started in the store from some unknown cause, about 3 o’clock in the morning, and was discovered by a passing citizen, who promptly rung in an alarm, but by the time the department arrived, immediately thereafter, the glass in the store front had broken out and flames were pouring from the front of the building. The department responded with 14 hose wagons, 8 engines, 4 hook and ladder trucks, 1 water tower. 1 turret nozzle wagon and 2 fuel wagons. There was an ample supply of water with 20 6-inch double hydrants, spaced 75 to 150 feet, available. The fire force succeeded in confining the lire within the walls of the building in which it originated and after a four-hours’ fight had it under control. The only trouble the firemen encountered, was from an explosion of gas, which caused the fire to spread. The supply of water from the direct pumping system, was sufficient to furnish good plug streams and supply engines, as the 80-foot street on one side of the building had two lines of pipe laid, a 6 and 12-inch, and the street on the other side, 40 feet wide, had a 10-inch main. The pressure at the hydrants was about 75 or 80 pounds. The men stretched 10.000 feet of cotton, rubber-lined hose, only one length of which burst during the fire. The largest number of streams thrown at one time was 15, from 1 1/8 to 2-inch nozzles and including two hydrant streams, eight single from engines, one six-way turret stream, one fourway water tower stream, one three-way deck nozzle stream and four standpipe streams, from private pumps across the street. The water tower and three-way deck nozzle streams, were thrown from Eastman nozzles. Chief Egner estimates the loss on buildings, at $75,000, on contents, including trunk store, drug store, barber shop and offices of $35,000.

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