THE SEASON OF FIRE CONVENTIONS

THE SEASON OF FIRE CONVENTIONS

Annually in the early fall of the year fire departments all over the country assemble in convention, the purpose of which is plainly told in the efficient service that these organizations are daily rendering to the community. Nearly every State has its own association, and in many States associations are composed of one, two or three counties. As volunteer departments are gradually being merged into paid departments, interest in the welfare of each increases, and the annual meetings are looked forward to as an event where every member can add to his knowledge along the lines of fire extinguishment. The greatest annual event perhaps is the meeting of the International Association of Fire Engineers, which has just closed its convention in New York City. The various State associations, however, have performed as good work, only on a smaller scale. The next in importance perhaps is the Pacific Coast Association of Fire Chiefs, which held its annual meeting in Tacoma, Wash., last week, an account of which may be found in next number of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING. The International Association convention held last week has been pronounced the most successful from all standpoints in the organization’s history The accessibility of New York to the manufacturers of apparatus resulted in large exhibits, and the many attractions made the entertainment of guests so comparatively easy that their cup of pleasure was running over when the grand climax in the form of a banquet at the Hotel Astor on Saturday night was reached. The election of Thomas W. Haney, chief of the Jacksonville fire department, to the presidency was a foregone conclusion, and the choice of Hugo Delfs. of Lansing, Mich., for first vice-president places in line for the presidency another year one of the acknowledged scientists in the fire extinguishing field. Wisdom ruled the choice of Harry L. Marston, of Brockton, Mass., for second vicepresident, which was only a small way of showing appreciation of his work as chairman of the exhibit committee. James McFall and George Knofflock, as secretary and treasurer, respectively. keeps in office two men who have proved their worth in these positions. It is nine years since the International Association held a convention in the South, and the selection of New Orleans for the meeting place in 1914 was a fitting compliment to that city, whose citizens received the association so warmly in 1983, when the lamented Chief O’Connor was president.

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