THE TALLEST BUILDING IN THE WORLD.

THE TALLEST BUILDING IN THE WORLD.

The Park Row Syndicate building, New York city, which is rapidly nearing completion, is thirty stories high. It is the tallest building in the city, if not in the world. The illustration given herewith is made from a late photograph taken especially for this paper. The building proper is twenty six stories high, with two towers of four stories. Its height from the curb to the top of the cupolas is 386 feet, It has a frontage on Park row, facing the post office, of nearly 104 feet; the wing on Ann street shows a twenty-foot front, and forty-eight feet on Theatre alley. The depth of the building is 154 feet. The area covered is 15,000 square feet of sandy formation. Piles to the number of 3,500 were driven into this soil to a depth of twenty feet. These piles are from ten to fourteen

inches in diam r at the head, and twenty to twenty-five feet ete long. The excavation below the curb is thirty-four feet, and from twelve to sixteen inches more space was excavated round the heads of the piles, which was filled in with concrete of cement, sand, and hollow broken stone. Upon the concrete tapping are laid large granite blocks for bases for the piers, which are of brick, with granite capstones to carry the grilage beams. 1 he bottoms of these grillage beams are twentynine feet and one and one-half inches below the first floor level. Each foundation had to be especially designed for the column loads to be sustained by it, the size of girders and the weight of grillage beams varying according to location. The distributing girders are of plate construction and range from eight to forty-seven feet in length, and forty-four to ninety-six inches in depth. The weight of the largest girder at Theatre alley is 105,380 pounds; its length is forty-seven feet. The main roof over the twenty fifth story is formed flat and carries a water tank of to,000 gallons capacity. The amount of steel in the building is 9,000 tons. The cupolas on the towers are covered with planished copper. The floors, which are of terra cotta, are guaranteed to carry 500 pounds to the square inch. The elevators to carry so many passengers as will use them daily will be very fast—that designed for freight must carry 8,000 pounds, and the other cars 3,000 pounds each. Durthe ten hours the cars will make 200 full trips each. The architect is R. H. Robertson, of New York city. A. Pauli is inspector for the building under him. The steel work was designed by N. Roberts, C. E., of New York. John Downey was contractor for the gentral work, and T. P. Galligan for excavation. The steel and iron was furnished byj. B. and J. M.’Cornell, and the masonry by Dawson & Archer. The cost of the building was ov3r $2,000,000.

THE TALLEST BUILDING IN THE WORLD.

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