THE TITUS WELLS ON LONG ISLAND

THE TITUS WELLS ON LONG ISLAND

The work done by Silas W. Titus in increasing the outflow of the Long Island wells that supply the borough of Brooklyn, New York, has already been fully described in these columns. He keeps on at his task, and bids fair not only to give Brooklyn a sufficiency of water, but, also, to make a large profit for himself, at the rate of $30 for every additional million of gallons he supplies over the amount the old wells used to supply daily. With only fifteen out of the twenty wells at Jameco in operation, and with his plant not yet completed and two more years of his contract still to run—at the end of which wells and machinery become city property—he is now obtaining 9,000,000 gals, daily, instead of the 1,250,000 gals., which formed the outflow when he began his work. This amount he is confident he will be able to increase very much. The water is of very clear and very pure quality and flows in an 8-in. stream. The ground is mostly on the surface, and, with high winds, it is salt above: but the water he has found comes from far beneath a clay bank, where it runs between sand and gravel, and is thus naturally filtered. It is not necessarily water depending on the rain that falls on Long Island—there is a good well on Barren, island, which he claims is certainly not rain water—it probably comes from a great distance. Mr. Titus is a man of much practical experience as a water purveyor, and his improvcmeras are not very costly. He has’ a contract with the Brooklyn (Rapid Transit conipanv, which had been paying the City $153 a day for a water supply that was hardly adequate. His offer to put in a plant, which should be enough to furnish the company at the same rate of pay with all the water it could possibly need, was accepted, and he put in what is said to be the largest plant of its kind HSP’the United States in Third avenue, between Second and Third streets, some fifty feet from the Gowanus canal. It amply fulfils his claims. Mr. Titus does not force the water at the start—the general experience is that the flow becomes less after the start; he keeps on getting more than he did at first. Seven years ago wells had been driven at Massapequa by the city to a depth of 500 ft.; but no water was obtainable He sank one between 500 and 600 ft., with another by its side of 125 ft., with the result that by his system he could pump 4,400,000 gals. He is using only old wells, and the city does not pay him anything like as much as it docs the Citizens’ company, which gets $65 per 1,000,000 gals., and manufacturers using 1,000,000 gals, of that company’s water daily pay $133 daily for it. He has made another suggestion to the department of water supply, which, if accepted, he expects will turn out a record-breaker. If it is unsuccessful, it will not cost the city one cent; but, as he has already outdone himself and what he said he would do, he has no fears on that score. Wherever his wells are being worked, the air-lift process is being used, and the machinery is all new, the best possible, and has all the Titus patents—especially one concerning the proper utilisation and placing of the gravel. He makes no pretence at science; he professes to be only a practical water-getter, but a successful one. He contracted to secure for Elizabeth, N. J., 5,000,000 gals, daily; he secured 8,000,000. He had similar success at Savannah, Ga., and in Florida. He bought a strip of land in Texas four miles by ten, which was considered valueless, because (as was thought) it was waterless. He proved that there was abundance of water. At San Angelo, in the same State, by his efforts the Devil’s Ridge country was opened tip and water in abundance was found by him. His success at Winnipeg. Man., in Minnesota, the Michigan peninsula and California is also well known. His present belief is that Long Island offers the greatest fielld for his work.

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