THE TRIP OF COLONEL DONAHUE.

THE TRIP OF COLONEL DONAHUE.

COLONEL JAMES P. DONAHUE, of Davenport, Ia., returned from a trip on Friday, the 18th instant. The last part of his journey was made memorable by the exciting race between the Lucania and St. Louis, the former beating her rival by one hour and ten minutes only. During the last two days both steamers were in sight of each other, and traveling at the rate of twenty-two knots an hour. Colonel Donahue returned from Liverpool on the Lucania and states that the trip was not as pleasant as might be expected, the passengers being confined below for two days, owing to rough weather. While in Jersey, England, the colonel saw a lecture on pumps advertised, and, being an enthusiast on the subject, he secured a ticket and soon found himself in a large hall with probably ninety-nine other savants. The lecturer, a medical practitioner, commenced his lecture by explaining that very little was known about the action of the pumps on the stomach and he promised by diagrams and other illustration to elucidate the subject. The colonel was naturally surprised to find he was in the midst of ardent followers of Esculapius instead of members of the water works fraternity; but, being somewhat of a medical man himself, he decided to to hear what the professor had to say about that important part of the human anatomy. What he learned, he says, was highlv instructive and he now claims to be an expert on stomach pumps as well as those that raise the turbulent water of the Mississippi to the splendid filters that supply the happy community of Davenport. If Colonel Donahue keeps on in his present course, he will undoubtedly out-distance that other celebrated colonel,Ochiltree.in being remarkably lucky man. While in London Colonol Donahue ran down to Putney to see his friend Jake Gaudaur row with Stansbury. While waiting for the start a sport,offered two hundred pounds sterling to one hundred that the Australian would beat the Englishman. The colonel quickly accepted the bet, and, of course, captured the money. He also had a similar pleasant experience on board the steamer,when he was lucky in taking nearly a like amount in several of the schemes in which he took chances. Altogether the trip was a series of happy events, and our friend is now congratulating himself that, when his winnings are counted up, he will have had a very present outing with little or no no expense. We trust the colonel will have as much luck in his matrimonial venture, as from present indications it looks as if he has serious intentions of ending his days of bachelorhood. We may be mistaken in this surmise; if so, we tender the colonel our humble apologies.

Barn, with contents, of C. Bonta, Denton, Tex., struck by lightning and totally burned. lxss, $3,000; insurance onehalf.

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