THE UNIVERSAL PIPE.

THE UNIVERSAL PIPE.

When a good thing is invented and placed upon the market its adoption by those interested is only a matter of time. This is particularly so with the Universal pipe, manufactured by the Central Foundry company, of 113 Nassau_____street, Manhattan, New York. It was in iroduced about four years ago to the waterworks people and commanded immediate attention. as its merits were at once appreciated. In a pamphlet issued by the company, entitled “The Leaky Joint Problem and Mow Solved are shown the losses of gas in American cities as from twelve to fifteen per cent. In some instances it is stated to be from twenty-five to thirty per cent, and one case where all wrought iron mains were put together with screwjoints is cited to show that there was a leakage loss of sixty per cent. The principal causes for this leakage are given as follows: Expansion and contraction; the unequal settlement; impairment by oxidation and electrolysis; and jar. shock and vibration. The screw-joint of wrought iron pipe is as rigid as the pipe itself, and for this reason the threads, being less strong than the pipe wall, are liable to strip under the action of contraction and expansion. With reference to the waste of water, it is stated that few municipalities are so situated that their sources of potable water are equal to the triple demand of leakage, waste and use. A normal increase of consumption may be counted on; waste will increase in more than arithmetical ratio, unless checked by metering, and of leakage it may be calculated upon to keep well ahead of both use and waste to gether. The Universal pipe is claimed to be a solver of the leaky question. J. 11. Reiff, superintendent of the Mountain Water company, of Harrisburg, Pa., states that a two-mile line of eight-inch Universal pipe was tested and found tight in all joints, and he experienced great convenience in handling its six-foot lengths. In a communication to the Central Foundry company, P. O’Brian, city engineer, of Denver. Colo., says: “The adaptability of the pipe to vertical or horizontal curvature is quite astonishing. I have seen curves laid, naturally and without delay in the process, constituted of a curve departure from the tangent of one-twelfth the length of the line laid. This line, laid from your C. L. pipe, was immediately tested to 120 pounds active pump pressure in the city system without a single joint leak; a result which I do not believe it possible to accomplish with ordinary methods in the laying of bell-and-spigot pipe.” Among the other numerous strong indorsements of this pipe is that of L. N. Lincoln, superintendent of the Mauch Chunk Gas company, who states: “We have been laying this pipe since the 20th of May, and have given it the most severe tests, as considerable of our ditch has been blasted out of solid rock, and as a consequence was very crooked and uneven. In one instance we carried this four-inch pipe round a curve, making a ninety-degree bend in a distance of not over 300 feet. Such would have been impossible without the use of bends, with any other than Universal pipe.” One other statement that of the manager of Knickerbocker Construction company, New York, may be quoted. Me writes: “We have laid about seven miles of Universal pipe in LittleFalls, N. J., and, with the ordinary lead joint pipe we conld not have accomplished the work we had undertaken within the time limit. It is extremely doubtful, if of the second section referred to we could have handled the work at all during the fall, as it was practically impossible to have taken care of the great amount of water that worked through the soil from both the river and the canal close by, We will only say further that we are now con templating the construction of another water plant in Jersey in which we shall use Universal pipe. The pipe used in the above job was their middle weight pipe, part of which was made in Newark, N. J., and part of which was made in Bessemer, Ala.”

INTERIOR PUMPING STATION, EVANSVILLE, IND.W. L. GLAZIER, Superintendent, Newport, Ky.MARK DEAN, Inventor of Universal Pipe.

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